Tag Archives: Tokyo

Public Baths in Tokyo

In the past, every neighborhood in Tokyo had one or more public baths (sento). Over the last decade, however, this number has decreased. Recently, public baths have started becoming popular again. The larger ones now offer relaxation, dining and entertainment under one roof. The smaller ones allow people to get a feel of the old days. Onsen water does not surface naturally in Tokyo but modern pumping and boring technologies have made it possible to get naturally heated water anywhere—you only must go deep enough. Because of this, several large bath complexes with hot spring water have mushroomed all over central Tokyo. 

Large Bath Complexes

Oedo Onsen Monogatari

This large bath is a few minutes’ walk from the Telecom Center Station. It is a hot spring theme park, opened in 2003. The atmosphere here replicates the Edo Period. It offers various kinds of both outdoor and indoor baths. On top of that, you can enjoy overnight stays, games, massage, restaurants and other entertainment. 

LaQua

LaQua is a well-known relaxation oasis located a short distance from Tokyo Dome. It was also opened in 2003. It features beauty and massage services, relaxation space, saunas and hot spring tools. The hot spring water in this bath is pumped from more than one kilometer deep. 

Niwa no Yu

This hot spring bath complex is in northwest Tokyo, close to Toshimaen Station. In this oasis, you will enjoy massage, relaxation areas, saunas, an indoor pool, different hot spring pools, a big Japanese garden and several dining options. The hot spring water in this bath is from 1400+ meters underground. 

Small Bath Houses

Oshiage Daikoku-yu

This sento has been there since 1949. It is an atmospheric bath located a few minutes from the Tokyo Skytree. This gender-separated public bathhouse features outdoor baths characterized by high walls. The interior has wooden flooring (changing area) and a tiled mural (bath area). They do not offer communal shampoo and body soap, but they rent out small and large towels.

Jakotsu-yu

This public bath is in Asakusa, not far from Asakusa Station. It has quite the history. Locals love to spend time there so visitors can mingle with them. Overlooking the main baths is a mural of Mount Fuji. This sento also features a roofed outdoor bath. There are simple amenity kits for sale and towels for rent. They provide communal shampoo and soap too. 

Atami-yu

You can find this bath in Kagurazaka, close to the JR Iidabashi Station. It was opened in 1954 and since then to date, water is heated using burning wood. The decorations here are classic and almost vintage. There are towels for rent, both large and small. Shampoo, soap, and amenity kits are not provided.

Minami Aoyama Shimizu-yu

This public bath is in a quiet place near the Omotesando Station. You will enjoy relaxing background music and several baths to choose from. They do not offer shampoo and soap, but you can buy amenity kits and rent towels. 

Tokyo Anime

Akihabara is the center of anime culture, manga, and gaming in Japan. There are numerous anime stores, maid cafes, electronic shops; and any self-professed otaku will love it there. The Nakano Broadway shopping mall is crammed with stores that stock anime goods. There are countless specialized branches of the popular Mandarake store. You will get cool items such as costumes, toys, and gadgets. 

Pokemon Stores and Pokemon Centers

They specialize in all kinds of Pokemon items like games, toys, stationery, cards, and exclusive items. They have areas where you can play Pokemon cards. Tokyo has four Pokemon centers such as Skytree Town, Lalaport Tokyo-Bay shopping mall, Ikebukuro’s Sunshine City, and Nihonbashi’s Takashimaya.

DiverCity Tokyo Plaza

This entertainment, dining, and shopping complex was opened in Odaiba in 2012. The attractions featured here are inspired by the Gundam anime series.  In fact, a huge life-size Gundam statue is right outside the building.

Theme Parks

One Piece Tower

This is an indoor amusement park located below Tokyo Tower. It is themed after the One-Piece manga series which is quite popular. It offers a wide variety of games, shows, and other fascinating attractions.  The Sanrio Puroland theme park mainly targets younger children. It features the most famous creation by Sanrio—Hello Kitty. There are live shows, theaters, boat rides, and Hello Kitty’s house. Namja Town is another indoor theme park by the creator of Pacman, Namco. Namja town was renovated recently and now has various attractions and small rides. 

In the Ghibli Museum, you will find characters from Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke, My Neighbor Totoro, and other Ghibli Studios films. There are also short exclusive films and special animation exhibits. 

Fujiko F. Fujio Museum

Originally called the Doraemon Museum, this museum showcases the work of Fujiko F. Fujio, a manga artist, who is the creator of the Doraemon series. In there you will find Doraemon’s original artwork, life sized characters, and a short film.

Suginami Animation Museum is found in the Suginami City Ward—a major center for anime production in Japan. It offers hands-on activities like a dubbing booth as well as a digital workshop for a chance to make your own creations.

Toei Animation Museum is nothing more than a large single exhibition room filled with numerous displays. However, it is one of the leading anime movies and series producers. Among its creations are Sailor Moon and Dragon Ball. 

Tokyo Anime Center was once located in Akihabara but was moved to the DNP Plaza basement close to the Ichigaya Station. The center hosts temporary rotating exhibitions, an event space, and a small shop for anime goods. 

Events

AnimeJapan

AnimeJapan was originally called the Tokyo International Anime Fair. It is the largest anime exhibition in the world. It is held at Tokyo Big Sight in the spring of every year. 

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Comiket (Comic Market)

This is the largest comic convention in the world. It is held twice every year, in summer and in winter. 

Tokyo Night Guide

Activities do not end when the sun sets in Tokyo. The nightlife there has something for everyone including chilling out, dining, partying, sightseeing, and much more. Here are activities that you may enjoy. At night, Tokyo becomes a city lit with bright lights. Up until 22:00, you can enjoy the view from the observation decks in tall buildings and towers.

The best observation decks include those at the Sunshine 60 in Ikebukuro, Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building, Tokyo Tower, and the Tokyo Skytree.  Additionally, some skyscrapers have restaurants at their top floors.

You can dine as you check out the breathtaking view. Although these restaurants are usually expensive, they are the better option for enjoying the night view once the observation decks are closed. For a unique experience, there are helicopter rides available—if you have the money. A boat cruise is also a good option.

Food

Dining is the most popular night activity. Whatever kind of dining establishment you are looking for, you will find it in the city; from small family restaurants, traditional izakaya to fancy Michelin restaurants. For an old-fashioned and authentic experience, Asakusa is your best option. Tokyo Station, Shiodome, and Shinjuku are known for top floor restaurants. 

Tokyo also has unique, themed restaurants. Shibuya has a prison-themed one, Shinjuku has a gothic church-themed one and Akasaka has a ninja-themed one. 

Theme Parks and Museums

Generally, museums cannot be considered night destinations because they close early. However, you can still find aquariums and museums that do not close until a little later. They include: Sunshine International Aquarium, Maxell Aqua Park Shinagawa, Sumida Aquarium and Mori Museum. 

DisneySea and Disneyland close at around 22:00.

Nightlife Districts

The best districts for nightlife in Tokyo are Roppongi, Ginza, Shibuya and Shinjuku. 

Kabukicho in Shinjuku is the biggest red-light district in Japan. There are literally hundreds of massage parlors, nightclubs, bars, restaurants, and hostess clubs. Although the district can be considered safe, you will occasionally bump into adult posters and shops. Shibuya is favorite for the younger audience. There are restaurants, dance lounges, bars, and nightclubs.

Ginza is a high-end district with chic nightclubs and bars, fine restaurants, and upscale hostess and host bars. Several establishments here are exclusive. Roppongi is more welcoming to foreigners. The restaurants, bars and nightclubs are easily accessible to tourists. It is generally safe but recently there have been rising cases of bad practices and vice.

Night Walk

Taking a stroll in the evening is a simple yet awesome way to experience the night in Tokyo. Sensoji Temple is a great place to visit at night. You will love the dimly illuminated lanterns.

For a quiet experience, consider Odaiba’s waterfront area. 

Onsen

Hot spring establishments are common in Tokyo. They offer entertainment, dining, relaxation, and baths. They are more like onsen theme parks. 

Other Entertainment

Tokyo has countless theater venues and concert halls where you can catch all kinds of shows. You can enjoy every genre of art festivals, drama, recitals, and concerts. Other things you can enjoy including winter illuminations and shopping.

The Best Hostels in Tokyo

Tokyo is a very expensive city. But you can still get affordable hostels. The hostels reflect Tokyo in cleanliness, charm, and art. Many of them will have Wi-Fi and cooking facilities. Generally, you will pay between 2000 and 5000 JPY for a bed per night. There are hostels for all kinds of people—those that want a peaceful time and the party animals. As you plan your trip, check out the following hostels that are some of the best in Tokyo. 

Khaosan Tokyo Origami

Located in Asakusa, this hostel is only a few minutes’ walk from Asakusa station and Senso-ji Temple. It is a clean facility with air-conditioning. You will enjoy comfy beds and spacious rooms. There are also privacy curtains. There is a common lounge with lots of free tea and coffee. The kitchen is available for use 24/7. Beds range from $29/3200 JPY and privates form $80/8800 JPY.

Sheena and Ippei

This hostel is small and is in downtown Tokyo just close to Ikebukuro station. It features unique décor and is quite homey. There is a refrigerator and microwave but no kitchen. Beds are from $37/4104 JPY and private from $138/15120 JPY.

Hostel Chapter Two Tokyo

It is near the Skytree station and is a family-run hostel. The dorms are well-equipped and modern. You will enjoy a beautiful view of Sumida River.

Beda are from $36/3900 JPY and privates from $84/9200.

Khaosan Tokyo Kabuki

Enjoy clean, comfy rooms with ensuite bathrooms. The hostel is a minute walk to Senso-ji gates.

Beds are from $25/2700 JPY and privates from $116/12750.

Hostel Bedgasm

It has a lively bar where you can meet fellow travelers. It offers a rooftop patio area and common kitchen.

Beds are from $32/3500 JPY and privates from $77/8500 JPY.

Kaisu Hostel

This hostel is a little expensive because it is fancier than other hostels.

Beds are from $39/4300 JPY.

Backpackers Hostel K’s House Tokyo

You will enjoy a beautiful, sunny common area. There is also a full kitchen.

Beds are from $26/2900 JPY and privates from $42/4600.

Unplan Kagurazaka 

This hostel is relatively new and is quite stylish and clean.

Beds are from $38/4200 JPY and privates are from $168/18500 JPY.

CITAN Hostel

There is a great kitchen and relaxed common area. It is in a peaceful neighborhood. 

Beds are from $27/3000 JPY and privates from $82/9000 JPY.

Space Hostel Tokyo

The best thing about this hostel is the rooftop lounge and comfy beds. It also offers several exciting events.

Beds are from $25/2700 JPY and privates from $120/13200 JPY.

Book and Bed Tokyo

This is both a hostel and a bookstore. It is peaceful and unique.

Beds are from $35/3800 JPY.

Hostel & Café East57

This hostel has multiple beds and rooms. You will get a laundry room and Wi-Fi as well. Beds are from $20/2200 JPY.

IRORI Hostel & Kitchen

This one offers lots of equipped kitchen spaces. 

Beds are from $27/3000 JPY.

Tokyo travel guide – introduction

Traveling to a foreign country is adventurous, more so when you are doing it with children. A lot is involved, including safety concerns and logistics. Because of this, you should be perceptive when choosing destinations so your trip can be both easy and safe. Japan is an awesome holiday destination.

The difference in culture will broaden the horizons for your kids. Besides, it is one of the safest countries in the world. The following tips will help you get a fantastic experience from your trip. Japan has a very low crime rate such that subway graffiti will make front-page news. Another thing, it is a cash economy. ATM machines are countable and not many vendors will take credit cards.

Anyway, feel free to carry cash without fear of robbers and abduction. Unlike in Europe and North America, Japan has very few traffic signs, guard rails, and other things meant to prevent the occurrence of accidental injuries. Since there is a low crime rate, spend less energy guarding your wallet and more watching your kids. Be careful where there are potential hazards.

Signs are in Japanese writing (kanji). You will notice that some streets do not have names and building numbers are not in geographical order; they are in chronological order. Never leave your hotel without a map and. To be on the safe side, plan your routes in advance. Also, make a sketch of the main kanji you will require for your trip—station or city names. When in populated areas such as public transport, you can easily lose one or two family members in the crowds. always keep hands on each other, especially when moving.

Sexual media is all over in Japan—posters, vending machines, comic books, and even daily papers. In many towns, you may come across a giant statue of a vagina or penis. This is a fertility shrine. Do not let them ruin your family trip. Be ready to answer whatever questions your young ones may have concerning the topic. This is not something that should stop you from enjoying the Land of the Rising Sun. Kentucky Fried Chicken and McDonald’s are prominent in Japan.

Do not be tempted to let your kids eat American fast foods—even for one meal. It is not a good idea. Instead, visit yakitori restaurants, sushi shops and local food stalls. Japan has quite the diverse cuisine. You will miss out on so much if you do not try most of it.

Your family may not like it all but at least you will have stories to tell for years to come. English is taught in many schools, but many Japanese are not quite fluent. Your pocket dictionary will help with important phrases.

You can always point at a phrase and allow the locals to help you. When planning your trip to Japan, you should have an idea of what you should or shouldn’t do. This amazing country is a culturally interesting destination. Its history is both rich and intriguing.

Additionally, the society is bound by rules of behavior. This is necessary because of the huge population. A set of rules is required to hold together the society’s moral fabric. 

Image result for Sumidagawa Fireworks

Do not litter

The Japanese are recycling fanatics. Rubbish bins are rare. In fact, there is such a thing as rubbish shaming. 

Try pachinko

This is an illegal way to gamble. If you are not into this, then just find a pachinko parlor and enjoy the color and noise. 

Image result for japanese women

Have an onsen

Make sure you read the rules first. 

Try Japanese food

Japanese food includes okonomiyaki, Miso soup and, of course, sushi. 

Learn Japanese phrases

If you are visiting a foreign country, it is nice to know a few phrases such as how to say, ‘thank you’.

Embrace the inner Hello Kitty in you

The Japanese are obsessed with cute. Try and find out why.

Enter a drinking competition

You will lose in a beer or sake drinking competition with the Japanese. 

Drinking sake in Japan

Drinking sake involves a few rituals in Japan. Sake may be smooth, but it kicks. 

Go to karaoke

In Japan, all booths are private. It is a good opportunity to make a fool of yourself.

Acquire a Suica card

This is an e-card that you can use to buy goods and pay for train rides. It simplifies things.

Eat at train stations and at a convenience store

In train stations and convenience stores, you will find fresh food. They change it every two hours.

Take off your shoes

Outside Tokyo, you may be required to take off your shoes while entering a restaurant or house. 

Japanese toilets

Have fun with the buttons in the toilets. You may get an unexpected wash, but it is still fun.

The vending machines

Vending machines are convenient for the large population. 

Slurp and burp

Slurping means you are enjoying your noodles. Go at it.

Do not finish your meal or drink

This implies that you are not satisfied and is considered offensive to the hosts.

Do not tip

No one will expect you to tip them. It is almost insulting.

Cell phone

Feel free to use your phone but not for calls on trains. Keeping quiet is considered respectful. 

Stay in a Ryokan

This is a traditional inn. It has tatami floors and is owned by locals. 

Do not eat or drink while walking

This is bad manners in Japan.

Explore Tokyo

Be sure to check out this big city. You will come across anime and manga characters. 

Punctuality

Being on time is crucial. The Japanese expect punctuality, always.

Eat at KFC on Christmas

This is one of the few places where you will get turkey.

Carry your business card

Exchanging cards is part of etiquette.

Do not blow your nose

You can sniff, just don’t blow.

Money Saving Tips – Tokyo Travel Guide

Tokyo is an awesome and crazy city. There are tons of things you can do such as eat all kinds of fantastic food, sing karaoke, party in the nightlife district, see amazing cherry blossoms, visit the morning fish market, go to the imperial palace and much, much more. It is one of those cities that you just have to visit at least once in your lifetime. Although it’s a fast-paced modern city, it still holds on to traditional roots. It is crowded but not chaotic. Traveling to Tokyo can be super expensive. However, this guide will give you tips on how to travel cheaply and have an impeccable experience. 

Top 5 Things to Do and See in Tokyo

Check Out Sensoji Temple

This temple is the oldest in Tokyo. It was built for two brothers who fished Kannon’s statue from Sumida River. Kannon was the goddess of mercy. It is said that, even after taking the statue back, it floated back to them occasionally. 

Admire the Tokyo Tower

The Tokyo Tower resembles the Eiffel Tower. It is, however, taller and is made purely of steel. To go to the top, you will have to pay 1600 JPY but you can get just as good a view for 900 JPY from the main observation deck.

Tsukiji Fish Market

This fish market is globally famous. The fish sold here is the sushi you see in restaurants all around the world. Tourists cannot participate in the tuna auction for now but you can visit once the auction is complete. Rise up and have sushi for breakfast.

Check Out the Imperial Palace

The residence of the Emperor of Japan is an exciting place. You will love it if you are interested in the current events and history of Japan. There is a beautiful garden and park surrounding it. Just like in the Buckingham Palace, there is a daily guard change. Admission is free but advance booking is required. 

Go to the Ueno Park

Go there and relax for a day. It is more interesting when trees are blossoming because a big festival is held at this time.

Typical Costs

Hostel Prices: you will pay around 2000 to 5000 JPY for a dorm bed per night. Most of them are clean but there are filthy ones as well. A capsule hotel is the best.

Budget hotel prices: you will pay about 7000 – 11000 JPY for a private room with breakfast.

Average cost of food: donburi stalls and ramen noodle shops are all over and range from 250 to 1240 JPY. A restaurant meal will cost you roughly 1850 JPY. 

Transportation: an all-day train ticket will cost you 750 JPY while a bus ticket is 500 JPY. You can get a combo ticket for 1600 JPY.

Money Saving Tips

  • Avoid taxis.
  • Shop at 100 Yen stores.
  • Eat at 7-Eleven.
  • Acquire a transportation pass.
  • Use sites such as Couchsurfing.
  • Work to stay in your room for free.
  • Sleep in a manga/internet café.
  • Make use of rideshares.

The 13 Best Hostels in Tokyo

Tokyo is a very expensive city.

But you can still get great affordable hostels. The hostels reflect Tokyo in cleanliness, charm and art. Many of them will have Wi-Fi and cooking facilities. Generally, you will pay between 2000 and 5000 JPY for a bed per night. 

There are hostels for all kinds of people—those that want a peaceful time and the party animals.

As you plan your trip, check out the following 13 hostels that are some of the best in Tokyo. 

Khaosan Tokyo Origami

Located in Asakusa, this hostel is only a few minutes’ walk from the Asakusa station and Senso-ji Temple. It is a clean facility with air-conditioning. You will enjoy comfy beds and spacious rooms. There are also privacy curtains. 

There is a common lounge with lots of free tea and coffee. The kitchen is available for use 24/7. 

Beds range from $29/3200 JPY and privates form $80/8800 JPY.

Sheena and Ippei

This hostel is small and is in downtown Tokyo just close to the Ikebukuro station. It features unique décor and is quite homey. There is a refrigerator and microwave but no kitchen.

Beds are from $37/4104 JPY and private from $138/15120 JPY.

Hostel Chapter Two Tokyo

It is near the Skytree station and is a family-run hostel. The dorms are well-equipped and modern. You will enjoy a beautiful view of Sumida River.

Beda are from $36/3900 JPY and privates from $84/9200.

Khaosan Tokyo Kabuki

Enjoy clean, comfy rooms with en-suit bathrooms. The hostel is a minute walk to Senso-ji gates.

Beds are from $25/2700 JPY and privates from $116/12750.

Hostel Bedgasm

It has a lively bar where you can meet fellow travelers. It offers a rooftop patio area and common kitchen.

Beds are from $32/3500 JPY and privates from $77/8500 JPY.

Kaisu Hostel

This hostel is a little expensive because it is fancier than other hostels.

Beds are from $39/4300 JPY.

Backpackers Hostel K’s House Tokyo

You will enjoy a beautiful, sunny common area. There is also a full kitchen.

Beds are from $26/2900 JPY and privates from $42/4600.

Unplan Kagurazaka 

This hostel is relatively new and is quite stylish and clean.

Beds are from $38/4200 JPY and privates are from $168/18500 JPY.

CITAN Hostel

There is a great kitchen and relaxed common area. It is in a peaceful neighborhood. 

Beds are from $27/3000 JPY and privates from $82/9000 JPY.

Space Hostel Tokyo

The best thing about this hostel is the rooftop lounge and comfy beds. It also offers a number of exciting events.

Beds are from $25/2700 JPY and privates from $120/13200 JPY.

Book and Bed Tokyo

This is both a hostel and a bookstore. It is peaceful and unique.

Beds are from $35/3800 JPY.

Hostel & Café East57

This hostel has so many beds and different kinds of rooms. You will get a laundry room and Wi-Fi too.

Beds are from $20/2200 JPY.

IRORI Hostel & Kitchen

This one offers lots of equipped kitchen spaces. 

Beds are from $27/3000 JPY.

Check out this newly designed interactive restaurant in Tokyo, Japan

Art collective teamlab has created an immersive interactive restaurant in Tokyo’s ginza district. the exclusive eatery, which serves just eight guests per day, provides diners with a unique multi-sensory experience that conveys the tastes, smells, and scenic beauty of japan. the immersive space combines elegant cuisine and ceramic art with real-time projections that canvas the restaurant’s walls and tables.

teamlab-saga-beef-interactive-restaurant-sagaya-ginza-tokyo-designboom-06

Located inside ‘saga beef restaurant SAGAYA ginza‘, teamlab’s new installation is titled ‘worlds unleashed and then connecting’. ‘when a dish is placed on the table, the scenic world contained within the dish is unleashed, unfolding onto the table and into the surrounding space,’ say the designers. ‘for example, a bird painted on a ceramic dish is released from the dish and can perch on the branch of a tree that has been unleashed from a different dish.’

Teamlab-create-Immersive-Interactive-Restaurant-Interior-that-changes-with-the-seasons-14-1024x581

The sizes and shapes of the projected objects are also affected by the other dishes on the table. this creates an environment of constant change, designed to reflect japan’s changing seasons. furthermore, the projections are influenced by the diners’ behavior. ‘if you are still, a tiny bird might alight on your hand; if you move suddenly, it might fly away,’ explains teamlab. the restaurant’s menu and presentation, which changes monthly, includes a 12-course meal with dishes including black wagyu beef and seasonal vegetables.

Teamlab-create-Immersive-Interactive-Restaurant-Interior-that-changes-with-the-seasons-15-1024x581

 

When wood becomes lace: Innovative fabrics on spotlight at Tokyo Fashion

Wood fashioned into lace and sculpted into evening dresses: the Hanae Mori Manuscrit label led the way this Tokyo Fashion Week in showing the world the original craftsmanship that helps set Japan apart from the crowd.

Dresses of persimmon wood lace paired with soft falling black fabric were the star of the show at designer Yu Amatsu’s autumn-winter 2017 collection for the brand that left fashionistas giddy with excitement.

Discs of chestnut and walnut were used on a dress of interlocking triangular panels, an homage to Issey Miyake’s iconic Bao Bao bag, while wood was fashioned into sleeve ties and delicate butterfly hair pieces.

Japan is famous for high-tech and specialty fabrics, which not only supply the likes of Chanel and other celebrated couture houses, but also provide constantly shifting inspiration for homegrown designers.

Misha Janette, a Tokyo-based stylist, creative director and blogger who has lived in Japan since 2004, said Japanese fashion was often less about entertainment and more thoughtful with “amazing” material.

“They’re really, really keen on working with young designers to create new fabrics… that sets them apart,” she told AFP. “Each little village has its own special kind of fabric.”

Amatsu said the theme of his collection was “combine,” which translates to combining fabrics to create something that was both different and more beautiful.

3-D silhouette

The persimmon was originally very hard. “Even the sewing machine needle couldn’t go through it,” he explained. So he striped it down to 0.14 millimeters wide and bonded it with fabric to make it stronger.

He then stitched it into a lace butterfly pattern. “It’s quite heavy so when you move with the dress it makes a 3-D silhouette,” he told AFP.

Throughout, he was careful to preserve the color of the wood, making it look almost like pencil shavings or delicately processed tree bark, and there were belts and statement bags in the same material.

Inspiration comes from the world at large. “I’m always looking around to find something interesting which can be key for new designs, like the movies, music, architecture and so on,” he said.

womenswear-tokyo-fashion-week-inspwall

But wood was far from the only innovative fabric on the runway this Tokyo Fashion Week, which showcased the works of 52 designers.

Husband-and-wife label ROGGYKEI, known best for dressing American superstar Lady Gaga a handful of times, bases itself in Japan’s second city of Osaka to be close to specialist fabric factories.

The pair has no plans to relocate, recognizing their “made in Japan” heritage was a big boon when they exhibited in Paris in 2012.

Good technique

The fabric is 50 percent polyester, 50 percent wool, which designers Hitoshi and Keiko Korogi said makes it more supple. They also use some processed fabrics which they dye and wash.

There was a stole made out of a special cashmere woven from Mongolian yarn in Japan’s Nara and coated to make it washable and yet prevent pilling. They presented tie-dyed and indigo-dyed stoles too.

ROGGYKEI also used discarded pieces of cloth that would otherwise have been thrown out, and mixed natural materials and chemical fiber.

But at least one Japanese designer with an emphasis on cutting edge fabrics admitted to shopping elsewhere.

Takuya Morikawa offered a high-energy, Americana-inspired collection of silk dresses, fur and a maroon velvet jumpsuit for label TAAKK, which he set up in 2012 after working for Issey Miyake.

“All the fabrics are originals,” he told reporters. “The jacquards were made in Japan, but I had the embroidery made in China and India as it would have cost a lot to do in such good quality here.”

“Of course Japan has good technique, but I am not too hung up on it,” he explained. “I’d rather use good things from everywhere in the world.” JB

Read more: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net/258397/when-wood-becomes-lace-innovative-fabrics-on-spotlight-at-tokyo-fashion-week/#ixzz4cXG8WV1r
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