Tag Archives: relationships

WHY TEYANA TAYLOR & IMAN SHUMPERT ARE #RELATIONSHIPGOALS

It’s no secret that Teyana Taylor and Iman Shumpert are head over heels in love.

The “Do Not Disturb” entertainer is very public and affectionate about her hubby, and naturally, she showed him and the world just how much he means to her on his special day.

“Last night I looked up and matched each star with a reason why I love u,” Taylor wrote as an Instagram caption. “I was doing great, until I ran out of stars! No amount of stars can match my love for you. The sweetest thing I’ve ever known, happy birthday my love @imanshumpert #BirthdaySexBoutToBeExtraLit #FinnaSnatchHisSoul #TheSoulSnatcher”

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Naturally, fans of the couple responded positively to Taylor’s hilarious hashtags and very sweet message to her Mr.

“That’s a dope ass pic !” one Instagram user commented.

“Beautiful couple 😍😍💖💙,” wrote another.

“Awww…I Love It…Black Love,” another comment read.

We love it, too.

Source:

https://www.jetmag.com/life/teyana-taylor-iman-shumpert-birthday-wish/

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How Travel Leads to Stronger Romantic Relationships

Travel is at once a never-ending source of new experiences and memories, but also a testing ground for a relationship’s strength.

Last year, a flight delay almost ended my marriage.

My wife and I were en route to a West Coast wedding when a storm diverted us from our layover in D.C. to an unexpected landing in Richmond, Virginia. Ever easygoing, my wife embraced the situation, securing us a flight out the next morning and reserving a room at a boutique hotel. Prone to panic, I soon broke the serenity when I realized our bags were still on the original flight. To save our orphaned luggage, I forced us back on the plane to our nation’s capital—headed to an airport we no longer had tickets out of. Tensions were high; regrets were immediate. As we approached, the pilot announced that another squall had us rerouted, once again, to Richmond. We submitted to fate, and ended the evening sharing laughs, Korean tacos, and one-too-many craft brews in the historic Virginia capital.

Though the stakes may be exaggerated, the point is sound: Travel is a test kitchen for a committed relationship. When a couple spends uninterrupted time together for an extended period in an unfamiliar setting, the challenges that arise truly test their mettle. But for those who endure through adversity, the rewards of a travel-eccentric relationship are bounteous—and research backs this up.

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A 2012 survey by the U.S. Travel Association revealed that couples that took regular trips reported higher levels of satisfaction with their relationships, and considered their vacations an important venue for romance. Similarly, a 2013 Journal of Travel Research article by experts at Texas A&M found that partners who traveled together experienced improved communication, and that connectivity extended into their life back home—with one important caveat. For a couple to reap such benefits, they must want the same thing out of the vacation, and that experience must include shared activities that nurture the relationship.

“Vacation experiences are made up of seeking and escaping motives. Some are seeking adventure; others are escaping and want to relax. The dyad has to match up,” says Dr. James Petrick, professor of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences and co-author of the Texas A&M review. “Outside of your usual environment, you have to process much more and evaluate situations in an in-depth manner. Vacations awaken all your senses. You’re more in tune with each other, with the environment around you.”

Cincinnati residents Jocelyn Gibson, 34, and Justin Leach, 33, were married last October after dating since 2014. Part of what drew them together was a mutual love of travel—the pair have already flexed their compatibility on excursions to Madrid, Copenhagen, Marseille and Berlin in that three-year span. While they cop to the occasional argument—Justin likes to plot things out, while Jocelyn prefers to wander—they have similar interests, leaving much to bond over.

“We are constantly noticing the historic architecture, street life, public spaces,” Gibson says. “We both love food, so our meals are satisfying and memorable. On countless occasions we will be doing something ordinary, and we’ll recall a specific memory from one of our trips and be struck by nostalgia.”

Source:

http://www.cntraveler.com/story/how-travel-leads-to-stronger-romantic-relationships

Forget hookup culture. The ‘talk’ your kids need is about relationships

When I was 11 years old, copies of the now defunct Australian teen magazine Dolly started mysteriously showing up in my family’s living room. At the time, I thought my mother was buying them for her own entertainment, and passing them on to me when she was done the way she did the other magazines she read. But with a couple of decades hindsight, I now realize the magazines were purchased for my benefit.

At that point, I was already educated in the basics of sex and puberty. But the magazines provided answers to the questions that would plague my adolescence. How to a form a relationship? When was the right time to have sex? What did it mean to desire and be desired, and how did I fit into that? What is love? (Baby, don’t hurt me, don’t hurt me…)

The answers the magazines gave me weren’t always the most constructive, but their presence in our house sent a clear and important message: that in our family, sex and relationships were subjects that could be discussed openly and without fear.

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Not much has changed, if a new study out of Harvard University is to be believed. The report, titled The Talk: How Adults Can Promote Young People’s Healthy Relationships and Prevent Misogyny and Sexual Harassment, argues that frets about a “hookup culture” of allegedly rampant casual sex are misplaced. In reality, only 8% of US 18- to 19-year-olds have had four or more sexual partners in the past year, and the vast majority of 18- to 25-year-olds report dating in exclusive relationships or not at all. According to a widely-reported 2015 study on sexual practices across generations, young people born in the 1990s are more likely to have had no sexual partners since the age of 18 than either Gen Xers or Babyboomers before them.

That doesn’t mean that the spectre of “hookup culture” doesn’t shape young people’s expectations when it comes to sex. But these concerns are as likely to be emotional as they are practical – about what a good relationship looks like, how to avoid getting hurt, how to deal with breakups, and how to begin a relationship in the first place.

“Media images of love,” the authors write, may be more toxic than media images of violence – “in part because we are not taught to view them as aberrant.”

In movies, books, and on TV, sex is portrayed as a powerful force that transforms children into adults and ugly ducklings into sexy swans, and love as an instantaneous, unmistakable attraction that is driven as much by pain as by pleasure. In practice, these narratives lead us to measure our self-worth according to our ability to “catch and keep” a romantic or sexual partner, or to stay in a relationship that is abusive or otherwise harmful because our abuse is coupled with fevered declarations of love.

I observed the same sense of sex as what British sociologist Ken Plummer calls “the Big Story” in the men and women I interviewed for my 2015 book, The Sex Myth. As Sarah, 25, described it: “Everything in the media, literature, popular culture points to sex. If you’re not married or in a relationship, it’s expected that you’ll be hooking up with people and dating. That’s just what you do. You have a love life and you talk about whatever your latest chapter is.”

But while the topic we were ostensibly speaking about was “sex,” as in the Harvard report, the reason the subject mattered to us was because it was deeply tied up with our emotional lives. Whether we were women or men, queer or straight, sex was the lens through which we had been taught to evaluate our desirability, our capacity to connect with other people, and the status our existing romantic relationships. Talking about it openly and exchanging vulnerabilities served as a way to make sense of our experiences; to understand ourselves and how we fit in with other people.

Source:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/may/18/forget-hookup-culture-the-talk-your-kids-need-is-about-relationships

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