Tag Archives: instagram

French Instagram fitness star killed by exploding whipped cream canister

Rebecca Burger, a French fitness blogger, has died after a whipped cream dispenser exploded into her chest.

Burger, who had 160,000 Instagram followers and more than 55,000 Facebook fans, died over the weekend.

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Citing local reports in France, the BBC reported that she died of cardiac arrest after the accident, despite being attended to by medics.

Her family announced her death on Facebook, calling it a “domestic accident.” A warning about what her family described as a faulty dispenser involved in her death has also been posted on her Instagram. The message said the canister “exploded and struck Rebecca’s chest, causing her death”.

 

The dispensers shoot gas into a metal capsule, which keeps the pressure high. The BBC said a French consumer group had warned readers for years about faulty connectors that could break, allowing the gas capsules to be expelled at high speed.

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The BBC said such dispensers were involved in enough accidents that the government office for consumers issued a warning, saying the accidents stretched back as far as 2010 and could occur even after years of use.

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Source:

http://www.businessinsider.com/french-instagram-fitness-star-rebecca-burger-killed-by-exploding-whipped-cream-canister-2017-6

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A Men’s Label, Born on Instagram

Two men — one in Miami, the other in New York, both passionate about suits — stumble upon each other on Instagram. They feel a connection. Mutual respect on social media turns into real-life camaraderie. They meet, they click, they draw up a plan.

A business is born.

That is the origin story of Musika Frère, a label that specializes in custom suits that often come in unusual colors or patterns, and has drawn a clientele that includes Jay Z, Michael B. Jordan, Stephen Curry, Kevin Hart and even Beyoncé.

Its founders, Aleks Musika, 32, and Davidson Petit-Frère, 27, are somewhat famous in their own right: Mr. Petit-Frère has over 200,000 followers on Instagram, and Mr. Musika more than 178,000.

“Guys in suits and guys taking pictures of themselves really didn’t happen back then,” Mr. Musika said of the period when he and Mr. Petit-Frère first started their pages, about five years ago.

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Mr. Petit-Frère said: “We had a following. We just didn’t have a product.”

The brand they eventually came up with, at a Miami public library in 2013, reflects their particularities and interests. “We take inspiration from the ’20s, ’30s, and remix it,” Mr. Petit-Frère said. “We call it neo-classical tailoring.”

Mr. Petit-Frère added, “It’s a small detail, but it’s also a big detail.”

Neither designer comes from a traditional fashion background. Mr. Petit-Frère, a native New Yorker, began working in real estate at 18. “I was wearing polo shirts and pants and square shoes to the office,” he said. “I realized I wasn’t a sharp dresser.” One of his co-workers referred him to his tailor, Badger & Welsh Bespoke, in Midtown. “As I made more money, I started to buy more suits,” he said, “and I realized my business was getting a big boost from that.”

Mr. Petit-Frère sent friends to Badger & Welsh, and he was eventually offered a line of his own, P. Frère, under the company’s umbrella. “In the beginning, I was more of an apprentice,” he said. “I learned about measuring, tailoring, the construction of suits. I learned the lingo and the history.”

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Instagram adds augmented reality face filters

Facebook’s Snapchat-style augmented reality face filters are coming to Instagram. Eight different filters will be available starting today, including a few different crowns, ones that make a person look like a koala or a rabbit, and another that sends math equations spinning around your head.

 

Instagram’s face filters will work whether you’re using the front or the back camera on your phone. You can find them by opening up the camera interface in the app and tapping the new icon in the bottom right corner. The filters can be used in any of Instagram’s shooting modes — photo, video, or even Boomerang. You can access them by downloading the new 10.21 update on the App Store or Google Play Store.

The idea of using augmented reality technology to map and apply animations to a user’s face was popularized by Snapchat, which bought Looksery — a company that pioneered the tech — back in 2015. Facebook responded by snatching up Belarusian startup MSQRD in early 2016, and the tech made its way into Facebook Stories earlier this year.

This is far from the first idea Facebook has lifted from Snap — adding Snapchat’s 24-hour Stories feature to Instagram is the real molten core of this entire drama — but augmented reality face filters were one of the last blockbuster Snapchat features that Instagram was missing. They are also just one small part of the much larger vision Facebook has for augmented reality, which the company laid out in detail at last month’s F8 conference. (Snap, of course, shares a similar vision.)

 

Instagram is also adding a few other features to the app today. Users will now be able to add hashtag “stickers” to a photo or video when posting it to their Story. Viewers will be able to tap these stickers to explore other media that’s been shared with the same hashtag, the same way you can already tag other users or apply geostickers. A new “rewind” video feature (also “inspired” by Snapchat) and an eraser have been added to the app as well.

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Source:

https://www.theverge.com/2017/5/16/15643062/instagram-face-filters-snapchat-facebook-features

SIZZLING SARA UNDERWOOD BLEW UP INSTAGRAM FOR EARTH DAY IN AN INCREDIBLY SKIMPY BIKINI

We know Sara Underwood’s thing is traveling the world and posing for photos in some of the most beautiful spots imaginable. So it only makes sense that she gifted her followers with a sexy Instagram post on Saturday April 22, a.k.a. Earth Day.

She captioned the pic with an earnest message stating that she was participating in one of the worldwide marches for science and wrote that “Our planet is at a critical juncture, and the science regarding it is under attack. Our voices matter, so I hope you get out and speak up for Planet Earth as well.” 

Whatever your views on climate change, it’s easy to appreciate the fact Sara is totally committed to nature and is so willing to reveal herself as she enjoys everything from the mountains to the Hawaiian islands. A few more shots from her Instagram below give us plenty of reasons to get into the natural world, especially when she’s there. 

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Source:

http://www.maxim.com/women/sara-underwood-tiny-bikini-earth-day-2017-4

Scale matters: Advertisers are opting for Instagram over Snapchat

Instagram is mimicking Snapchat, and Snapchat is feeling the pain.

Eight months since Instagram rolled out its Stories feature and just over a month since it launched ads on it widely, it has already surpassed Snapchat. The feature not only has more people using it daily (200 million versus Snapchat’s last reported 156 million) but is also increasingly attracting more ad dollars. Agencies tend to drift where the action is, and, right or wrong, the general feeling is Instagram is on the upswing while the early buzz over Snapchat is fading.

“Many of our clients are deprioritizing Snapchat,” said Tom Buontempo, president at Attention, KBS’s social media arm, who declined to provide names of specific advertisers but whose clients include BMW, Carvel, Novartis and Spotify. “It’s no secret that Instagram has Snapchat in the crosshairs.”

Instagram Stories, like Snapchat, lets users create multiple ephemeral videos and string them together for a 24-hour period. Brands have increasingly been using Instagram Stories, both to post organic content as well as to run ads. A combination of Instagram’s pure reach, targeting and retargeting capabilities and a more interactive relationship with reps has made Stories an attractive bet for brands. Meanwhile, Snapchat’s growth has been a concern for the past few months, with Instagram Stories’ rapid rise coinciding with its slow-down. Since Instagram Stories launched in August, Snapchat’s growth has fallen 82 percent, according to TechCrunch.

While Capital One, Nike, Ben and Jerry’s, and Netflix were among 30 brands that tested out ads on Instagram Stories before they were widely rolled out in March, brands including Honda, Apartments.com, Chobani and Five Hour Energy have run ads on the platform more recently.

Honda, which ran an ad on Instagram Stories for its “Flipbook Series” campaign on April 10, to market the Honda Clarity, chose Instagram over Snapchat for the campaign, because it let the brand tap into the scale of its 1.4 million-plus existing Instagram fans, said Mike Dossett, associate director of digital strategy at RPA, Honda’s agency. Brands already have large audiences on Instagram and often have to do absolutely nothing to get instant engagement at scale on their Story posts. Plus, they can easily tap into Facebook’s underlying infrastructure.

“From buying and optimization to measurement and reporting, Instagram ads (including Stories) are embedded directly within the Facebook ads ecosystem that buyers know and understand,” he said. “That undoubtedly removes a barrier for advertisers with entrenched processes or less nimble buying protocols.”

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For Ben and Jerry’s, it was all about scale. The brand was a part of a beta test between January and March, and ran ads on Instagram Stories to promote its new Pint Slices. The ice-cream maker saw a higher CPM rate than its usual benchmark, according to Jay Curley, Ben and Jerry’s senior global marketing manager, and the brand plans to run more ads over the summer.

“In general, we want to serve up relevant stories to our fans wherever they are,” he said. “We have a robust following on Instagram, and people are not only spending more time there but also consuming Stories there.”

It’s also far easier to buy ads on the platform as opposed to Snapchat. Unlike Snapchat, which does not have self-serve advertising options outside of on-demand geofilters (although one for Snap ads is expected soon), Instagram provides marketers with a unified dashboard for buying and tracking ads, making it easier for clients to target and track analytics across a more unified dashboard, said Attention’s Buontempo.

The larger Facebook ecosystem also provides for more nuanced targeting, said Ben Kunz, svp of marketing and content at Mediassociates. Brands can reach people with specific interests in ice cream, for example, or match targeting to their own CRM lists, with all of Facebook’s data toys at their disposal. Instagram also has more flexible buying options, letting buyers buy ads on a performance-based cost-per-click basis apart from a cost-per-thousand impressions basis.

“Both Instagram and Snapchat stories are clever full-screen immersive mobile ad experiences, but taking over a mobile screen is no longer exactly rocket science,” said Kunz. “So it’s not the ‘billboard’ space that matters; it’s the quality of the data behind it. Better audience data always equals better advertising performance.”

Still, it’s not a zero-sum game. Clients have been increasing their Instagram budgets overall to tap into Instagram Stories, said Danielle Johnsen Kerr, director of social and editorial strategy at Deutsch, but they aren’t necessarily shifting already-allotted Snapchat dollars to Instagram. Snapchat’s young audience is still a draw for advertisers, and the platform has also been making efforts to ramp up on measurement and to roll out more self-serve options. Ben and Jerry’s, for example, will also advertise on Snapchat in the summer.

“But it is dependent on the audiences our clients are trying to grab,” she said.

Source:

https://digiday.com/marketing/scale-matters-advertisers-opting-instagram-snapchat/

Irina Shayk Shares ‘Impossible’ Instagram Flaunting Her Bikini Body

Just weeks after giving birth, Irina Shayk is back in a bikini. The Victoria’s Secret model, who actually walked the runway at the annual show with a baby bump, shared a picture of herself in a black bathing suit on Instagram, relaxing in the pool on a pink lips-shape floatie. “Pre-sunset #currentsituation,” she wrote in the caption.

Many commenters were incredibly impressed — and largely in disbelief — with the ab snapback of the Russian model, who welcomed daughter Lea de Seine Shayk Cooper with partner Bradley Cooper on March 24.

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“You did not… just have a baby…Look amazing Irina!” one wrote. Others wrote “body goals,” “amazing,” and the “most beautiful woman in the world.”

Some, however, were skeptical that the photo was taken on the day it was posted. “4 weeks after giving birth, who even has the time or effort to take a image like this right after giving birth,” one shared. Another wrote, “I mean it’s impossible even for her to look like this after 3 weeks. I love her, but this has to be an old pic.”

Others jumped to Shayk’s defense. M.A. Garcia said that the body “needs time to recover, yes. But absolutely normal to hit your pre-pregnancy weight in a few weeks after giving birth. Especially someone her size whom probably didn’t gain much to begin with.”

As Sherry Ross, MD, a women’s health expert at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif., explained to Cosmopolitan, what a woman’s body looked like before giving birth has a lot to do with how fast someone returns to their prebaby figure. So the fact that Shayk’s a model and was extremely fit prior to getting pregnant, plays a lot into how she’s able to look so fit in a bikini already.

But, it’s important to keep in mind that Shayk isn’t necessarily “normal.” As Ross tells her patients, “It takes nine months to go through the pregnancy process, so allow yourself nine months during the postpartum period to have your body return to normal.”

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Source:

https://www.yahoo.com/style/irina-shayk-shares-impossible-instagram-flaunting-bikini-body-145943761.html

Instagram Debuts a New Pinterest-Like Feature

Photo sharing app Instagram added a new feature that challenges online bulletin board Pinterest.

Instagram’s users can now save their posted photos and videos in private collection, similar to what users of Pinterest have been able to do for some time. Saving posts on Instagram gives users a way to bookmark items they want to remember for the future, such as places to travel or products to buy.

The change to Instagram builds on a feature it introduced in December that lets users save posts from friends. Facebook-owned (FB, -0.18%) Instagram said on Monday that 46% of its users have saved at least one post since then.

Now users can create multiple collections of saved Instagram posts, and name those collections. For now, collections are private, meaning no one else can see them besides the users that create them. That’s slightly different than Pinterest, where users can choose to share items publicly.

Instagram hasn’t been afraid to copy the features of some of its rivals. In its quest to compete with messaging app Snapchat (SNAP, +1.65%), for example, Instagram has cloned a number of details including Stories, a feature for collecting and sharing photos and videos about individual events.

Last week, Instagram also updated its messaging service to be more like Snapchat’s by integrating its messaging feature with disappearing and direct messages.

Source:

http://fortune.com/2017/04/17/instagram-pinterest/

These 6 Instragrammers Are Getting Rich by Traveling the World

Love taking travel photos and sharing them with your friends on Instagram? So do the social media stars below. They’ve earned celebrity status — and sometimes six-digit incomes — from the travel snaps they post on the photo sharing giant.

Building such a loyal and monetizable following takes a long time, a lot of talent, and a little luck. But hopefully, their work can provide you with a bit of inspiration for your photography on your next trip. (See also: 5 Surprising Ways Social Media Stars Make Money)

1. Liz Eswein

Liz Eswein (@newyorkcity and her personal handle @lizeswein) started her account when Instagram first came out in 2010. Perhaps her early entry to the game helps explain how she was able to snag the handle @newyorkcity, which has now accumulated well over a million followers.

Eswein posts pictures of New York, one of the most popular tourist destinations in the world. Although her account wasn’t initially focused on travel, her success on Instagram has led her to travel to Chile, Namibia, and Dubai for different clients.

Her personal account has thousands of followers, and features destinations she’s visited such as Tokyo, Seoul, and Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

After beginning the Instagram account, Eswein told The New York Times she earned around $50 for a promotional post. But the Gazette Review reports that since then, she’s increased her earnings to $15,000 a post, making her one of the top earning Instagrammers in the world. The publisher estimates her net worth at $850,000.

2. Chris Burkard

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that professional photographer, writer, and videographer Chris Burkard (@Chrisburkard) has gained such popularity on Instagram, garnering more than 2 million followers.

His account features breathtaking shots from the Arctic Circle (his focus is surfing in freezing waters), Yellowstone National Park, Zakynthos Island in Greece, and many other places.

Burkard regularly works with Fortune 500 clients and has given a TED talk on how he found meaning in those frigid Arctic waters. According to his website, he began taking pictures when he was 19 years old, and his favorite place to travel is Iceland. (See also: How to Take Stunning Travel Photos)

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3. Julie Sariñana

Julie Sariñana is a blogger from Los Angeles, California. She began her blog in 2009 writing and posting about fashion, travel, and lifestyle. Today her Instagram account (@sincerelyjules) has an audience of more than 4 million followers.

As of June 2016, Gazette Review calculated her net worth at $800,000. She makes money by promoting products on her Instagram account and writing fashion articles. She also has her own fashion line, Shop Sincerely Jules.

Some of her recent destinations include Paris, Hawaii, and Costa Rica. She’s been featured in Teen Vogue and Elle, and has written for Glamour. Some brands she’s worked with on Instagram include Karl Lagerfeld and Nespresso. 

4. Julia Engel

Julia Engel’s Instagram account (@juliahengel) is focused on fashion and travel. Based in Charleston, South Carolina, Engel posts photos of destinations including the Bahamas, Iceland, and Miami on her account.

She’s parlayed her 1 million Instagram followers into $1.5 million, as estimated by Gazette Review. Some of her earnings are generated from a shopping app called LIKEtoKNOW.it, which allows Instagram followers who like a product they see in one of Engel’s photos to be directed to a website where they can buy it. Engels reaps a commission from every sale.

5. Emilie Ristevski

Emilie Ristevski’s account @HelloEmilie has about 400,000 followers. This Australian traveler started posting on Instagram when she was still in university and her travel-related posts attracted so many travel offers that she was able to turn Instagram posting into a living once she graduated, according to an interview with AWOL.

Some of her favorite destinations? Petra, Jordan, and New Zealand’s Milford Sound. She has worked brands including Moet and AirAsia.

6. Brooke Saward

Brooke Saward is the woman behind the @worldwanderlust Instagram account. Originally from Australia, her travels have recently taken her to Lake Como, Italy; Paris, France; and throughout Japan. With more than 600,000 followers, she’s attracted diverse brands such as Bose Australia and smartphone e-tailer Honor Global to work with her.

At just 24 years old, she’s been featured in Elle and Glamour. Her rates are unpublished.

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Source:

http://www.wisebread.com/these-6-instragrammers-are-getting-rich-by-traveling-the-world

How Instagram beat out Snapchat as fashion’s ‘social darling’

Snapchat wants to rival Facebook, but it should worry first about Instagram.

Although Instagram and Snapchat were launched within just a year of each other — in October 2010 and September 2011, respectively — fashion brands have made Instagram a cornerstone to their strategies while Snapchat remains, in most cases, firmly in the experimental bucket.

Most designers were hesitant to join Snapchat. They weren’t sold on its unfiltered nature that was inherently antithetical to the fashion industry’s pristine aesthetic. Many still aren’t — especially higher-end designers, said Jodie Chan, director of Altuzarra’s marketing and communications. She ultimately decided it’s “not viable for our brand and relevant to the demographic we are trying to reach.”

However, with time, a range of designers began to see the value of sharing behind-the-scenes looks at their personal lives and the business. Marc Jacobs joined Snapchat in fall 2016, just in time for New York Fashion Week, and then Burberry and Louis Vuitton followed by sharing announcements and photos from special events on the platform. So did Rebecca Minkoff and Prabal Gurung, longtime personal users who decided to let fans catch glimpses of their work lives. During the end of 2015 and early 2016, brands were clamoring to get on Snapchat.

Then Instagram announced Instagram Stories, and everything shifted. 

Snapchat meets its match
In August 2016, Instagram launched Stories, a feature that allows users to share photos and videos on their accounts that are visible for just 24 hours. In essence, Instagram now offered the best of both worlds — its glitzy photos, juxtaposed with the short clips for which users love Snapchat.

“As Instagram encourages more polished content, as well as tools that support content that feels instantaneous and ephemeral, that seems to address what it could have potentially lacked, in comparison to a platform like Snapchat,” Chan said.

Suddenly, brands that had been regularly active on Snapchat lay dormant, opting to share fleeting content on Instagram instead. As a result of Instagram Stories, Snapchat’s growth slowed by a whopping 82 percent. Snapchat had 122 million active users in Q1 of 2016 and 143 million by the end of Q2, raking in an impressive 17.2 percent growth rate. However, by Q3, its growth tumbled to 7 percent. At the same time, Snapchat did away with its autoplay feature, which had helped bolster story views for brands.

Instagram, on the other hand, already had a captive audience of 300 million users daily, who now only had to look at the tops of their screens to view Stories. According to TechCrunch, by October, its Stories feature had already amassed 100 million daily users.

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“Snapchat was certainly the social darling of 2016, and brands were smart to leverage the platform at the time,” said Camilla Opperman, research associate at L2. “However, Instagram Stories have proven to have greater reach than Snapchat, and brands are realizing that their resources can be more efficiently allocated towards Instagram.”

Meanwhile, the demographic differences between the two platforms remained telling. Today, Instagram users skew significantly older: 51 percent of its user base is above age 35, compared to just 14 percent of Snapchat users. These older users, in many cases, have more disposable income than their younger Snapchat-using peers, making Instagram particularly appealing to fashion brands.

“Instagram has a number of things working to its favor: It’s got a larger follower base and an older audience that’s more likely to be spending,” said Sucharita Mulpuru, an e-commerce advisor and the former chief retail strategist at Shoptalk.

The resource crunch
For fashion brands, many of which have nimble, short-staffed digital teams, the ability to have the capabilities of Snapchat and Instagram in one place has been particularly advantageous, according to Kyle Wong, CEO of Pixlee.

“Content generation is hard. These brands have a limited bandwidth to manage these social platforms,” he said. “Most fashion brands out there probably have one person max running social media accounts. They are spread thin between keeping multiple channels updated, rather than engaging the community on those channels.”

It’s also more laborious to create a follower base on Snapchat, which requires users to know a retailer’s exact username in order to follow them. With Instagram Stories, brands already have a built-in following that doesn’t require additional promotion.

“Instagram is definitely more brand-friendly than Snapchat,” Opperman said. “Most fashion brands already have Instagram accounts, so it’s much easier to move to Instagram Stories than learn the entirely new Snapchat platform. Instagram also has a leg up in discoverability, as Snapchat lacks a robust search function, making it difficult for consumers to find brand Snapchat accounts.”

Source:

https://digiday.com/marketing/instagram-beat-snapchat-fashions-social-darling/

Instagram Rolls Out Stories Ads to All Businesses

Instagram has been testing full screen ads in Stories, one of its most popular extensions, for a couple of months. Now it’s here and all businesses have the ability to advertise in Stories.

As the official release states, “By optimizing for reach, you can show your ads to the maximum number of people in your audience and control how often they see your ads.”

Once you’re creating ads in Facebook’s Ads Manager or Power Editor, select “Reach” as your objective and “Instagram,” and then “Stories” as the placement. Use a photo or a video that is no longer than 15 seconds to pop up between organic Stories. You will be able to get the same insights and statistics as with any other Facebook or Instagram campaign.

 

So what’s the big buzz about? Why should businesses present on the platform give this new advertising placement a try?

Reach

More than 150 million Instagrammers watch and create Stories daily. This number will only grow considering that the addition to Instagram’s arsenal is relatively new.

Plus, the talk of the town is a rendition of 24-hour ephemeral content now available on most major networks. This is not a passing trend. Stories (on any platform) are here to stay.

Immersive experience

Stories ads will be full screen, meaning nothing can distract viewers from your sponsored content. Besides, users watch Stories to find out something new, exclusive, or intimate. They are in the mood to receive new information — they are seeking it out. If done correctly, your ads (looking as native as possible0 will be viewed by a “warmed-up” audience.

Moreover, because Stories are short snippets, Instagrammers know that they have 10-15 seconds to spend on this content before it changes to the next thing. They are really, truly paying attention to what they are watching. Ten seconds of undivided attention on your product taking up the whole screen without being spammy — now that’s an amazing offer.

Engagement

Because you get their full attention, people are much more likely to engage with your ad. Airbnb, which was part of the original 30 global companies testing Stories ads, “saw a double digit point increase in ad recall.” People were more likely to select Airbnb for their travel needs afterwards. Overall, it seems like the company was very happy with their investment, which has “made a measurable impact.”

Eric Toda, global head of social marketing and content at Airbnb, summarizes it best: “reach the right audience, in the right mindset, with the right story at scale has allowed us to achieve the results we were hoping for.”

It is interesting to note that, historicall, new features on social platforms stay off-the-limits for advertisers for relatively long periods of time. It took Facebook three years to start monetizing Instagram. Here, on the other hand, we can clearly see that Instagram can’t wait to monetize its young Snapchat copycat and strike while the iron is hot. The company is not afraid to drive some users away with advertising, which shows how confident they are in the proposition.

With this level of conviction, the only thing advertisers can do is to start shooting video in vertical format and taking advantage of the new Instagram advertising placement.

Source:

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/290035