Tag Archives: colon cancer

Tips on A Homemade Colon Cleansing Diet for Weight Loss

What in the world does a homemade colon cleansing diet have to do with weight loss? Frankly, a whole darn lot! Just think about it for a minute. If you’re full of it you can be retaining body waste and holding fluid. A good cleansing of your colon will work miracles in the way you feel and help get rid of a few extra pounds. This article will provide you with some tips that will help you out.

Colon cleansing diets have the aim of refreshing and cleaning out your colon and other parts of your insides. The positive effect this has on your body is measured in several different ways.

1st. You will find yourself having more energy. As all that horrible debris is cleared from your body it makes you feel amazingly energized.

2nd. You will notice your skin looking clearer and more alive. You will have your loved ones asking you what you have done with yourself.

3rd.  You will reduce the bloating in your lower belly area. In fact, that new pair of tight jeans will go on easier and look better.

4th. You will lose weight fast.

This is the flow on effect from cleansing your colon.

Colon cleansing may be undertaken through a thorough cleansing action, such as pills or an enema. In addition, you can accomplish this through dieting. The second option is much less intrusive than the first and often; more effective. Meanwhile, while dieting you will be treating your entire body, mind and inner being to a healthier you.

There are some important things to remember when going on a homemade colon cleansing diet. These include:

– Drink at least 8 (8oz), preferably more, glasses of water per day. Spring or filtered water is better than tap water.

– Drinking fruit and vegetable shakes is a great way to stave off hunger.

– Eliminate dairy products – they are something to avoid when cleansing the body.

– Cut out red meat entirely or reduce your intake to 6 oz. or less. Meat is the major factor in the buildup of toxins in the body. A good substitute for the red meat is chicken or fish.

Steamed vegetables and fruit ideally should make up 90% of your colon cleansing diet. Steamed vegetables retain more nutrients than other ways of cooking vegetables which can often cook out the goodness. Raw vegetables are however the best, although sometimes not the tastiest, way to consume vegetables.

So, what other symptoms can colon cleansing assist with? You may be surprised to learn about how many minor symptoms are caused by matter built up in the colon. This may include:

          Headaches

          Tiredness

          Back ache

          Constipation

          Abdominal pain

          Bloating

          Depression

          Weight gain or loss

          Insomnia

          Acne

All the above symptoms can benefit from a homemade colon cleansing diet.

Today’s dietary trend of high fat foods is rather different to what humans were eating 100 years ago, but our bodies have not changed. This results in the body rejecting much of the food we eat and excessive build up in the colon is one negative result of this.

After completing your homemade colon cleansing diet, you must stick to a permanently healthy diet to retain colon and digestive health. As always when implementing a new change to your body it is always best to check with your medical doctor prior to taking the action.

This article is for informational purposes only. It should not be used as medical advice or as a substitute for medical advice.

An AI detected colorectal cancer with 86 percent accuracy

A new computer-aided endoscopic system that probes for signs of tumor or cancer growth in the colon may very well be the future of cancer detection. Assisted by artificial intelligence (AI), the new diagnostic system is able to tell if clumps of cells, called colorectal polyps, that grow along the walls of the colon are benign tumors known as colorectal adenoma.

The computer-assisted diagnostic system was trained using more than 30,000 images of colorectal polyps, each magnified 500-times, and operates using machine learning. The AI can check approximately 300 features of the polyp, which it compares to its existing “knowledge”, in less than a second. After having been used successful in preliminary studies, prospective trials followed. The results of these trials, the first for AI-assisted endoscopy in a clinical setting, were presented at the 25th UEG Week in Barcelona, Spain.

The prospective study was conducted by a team led by Dr. Yuichi Mori from Showa University in Yokohama, Japan. Mori and his colleagues tested the new system in 250 patients previously identified to have colorectal polyps. The AI predicted the pathology of each polyp, comparing it with final pathological reports taken from the resected specimens. The results were highly encouraging — the system assessed 306 polyps in real-time, with a 94 percent sensitivity, 79 percent specificity, and 86 percent accuracy. In identifying abnormal tissue growth, the system demonstrated 79 percent positive and 93 percent negative predictive values.

AI IN HEALTHCARE

In short, the AI was able to fairly accurately identify which abnormal colon cell growths were most likely to be cancerous. “The most remarkable breakthrough with this system is that artificial intelligence enables real-time optical biopsy of colorectal polyps during colonoscopy, regardless of the endoscopists’ skill,” Mori said, speaking during the Opening Plenary at the UEG Week. “This allows the complete resection of adenomatous polyps and prevents unnecessary polypectomy of non-neoplastic polyps.”

Furthermore, the researchers presented the results of their prospective study to prove that their system was ready for clinical trials.”We believe these results are acceptable for clinical application and our immediate goal is to obtain regulatory approval for the diagnostic system,” Mori added.

While this may be the first AI-enabled, real-time biopsy, as Mori described it, it’s not the first time AI has been used to improve medical diagnosis and overall medical research. For example, there is an AI effective in identifying skin cancer, and chipmaker NVIDIA is working on a moonshot project to accelerate cancer research using deep learning. Also working in cancer diagnosis is IBM’s Watson, which in some cases has proven to be 99 percent accurate in recommending the same treatments as doctors. Improved cancer detection can spell the difference between a treatment that works and one that doesn’t, so these advancements are potentially life-saving.

Moving forward, Mori’s team plans to conduct a multicenter study to aid eventual clinical tests. They’re also working on an automatic polyp detection system. “Precise on-site identification of adenomas during colonoscopy contributes to the complete resection of neoplastic lesions” said Dr Mori. “This is thought to decrease the risk of colorectal cancer and, ultimately, cancer-related death.”

Source:

https://futurism.com/ai-assisted-detection-identifies-colon-cancer-automatically-and-in-real-time/

Common Food Additive Promotes Colon Cancer in Mice

A popular food additive used in everything from dill pickles to ice cream is now linked to colon cancer, thanks to the way it impacts the gut.

 

Emulsifiers are added to most processed foods to improve food texture and extend shelf life. But it also throws off healthy levels of intestinal bacteria, triggering chronic, low-level inflammation that promotes colorectal cancer, according to a new study.

To be clear, scientists identified the potential cancer-promoting effects in an animal study. But the way I see it, it’s best to steer clear of these ingredients since various other studies suggest they impact the gut in unhealthy ways.

The finding comes on the heels of another gut breakthrough where researchers discovered fungus may trigger Crohn’s disease. Clearly, the microbiome greatly influences our disease risk. That’s why I make gut health the centerpiece of my practice and my personal health regimen.

Let’s take a closer look at this important new study, including ways to avoid this harmful class of processed food additives.


 

Hippocrates is famous for declaring that food is medicine. But his quote came long before the creation of lab-derived ingredients and processed foods. Here, we have just another example of how ingredients we often overlook can spell disaster for our health. In the recent food additive and colon cancer study, researchers at Georgia State University’s Institute for Biomedical Sciences found that mice that regularly consumed dietary emulsifiers experienced exacerbated tumor development. The results appeared in the journal Cancer Research

 

For this study, researchers focused on two of the most commonly used emulsifiers called polysorbate 80 and carboxymethylcellulose. They fed mice doses comparable to the cumulative amounts people would eat daily in processed foods. While the following findings need to be replicated in humans, I’m not taking any chances and will continue to avoid these “detergent-like” ingredients.

Consuming emulsifiers drastically changed the species composition of the gut microbiota in a manner that made it more pro-inflammatory, creating a niche favoring cancer induction and development, researchers pointed out. Alterations in bacterial species resulted in bacteria expressing more flagellin and lipopolysaccharide, which activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by the immune system.

Source:

https://draxe.com/food-additive-colon-cancer/

Heme Iron from Meat and Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Red meat and processed meat intake is associated with a risk of colorectal cancer, a major cause of death in affluent countries. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that heme iron present in meat promotes colorectal cancer. This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies of colon cancer reporting heme intake included 566,607 individuals and 4,734 cases of colon cancer. The relative risk of colon cancer was 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06–1.32) for subjects in the highest category of heme iron intake compared with those in the lowest category. Epidemiological data thus show a suggestive association between dietary heme and risk of colon cancer. The analysis of experimental studies in rats with chemically-induced colon cancer showed that dietary hemoglobin and red meat consistently promote aberrant crypt foci, a putative precancer lesion. The mechanism is not known, but heme iron has a catalytic effect on (i) the endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds and (ii) the formation of cytotoxic and genotoxic aldehydes by lipoperoxidation. A review of evidence supporting these hypotheses suggests that both pathways are involved in heme iron toxicity. Cancer Prev Res; 4(2); 177–84. ©2011 AACR.

Introduction

Cancer of the colon and rectum, taken together, are the third most common type of cancer worldwide (1). In most publications, colon and rectal cancer are studied together and the term colorectal cancer (CRC) is used, which we also use here, except when the publications refer specifically to colon or rectal cancer. CRC is the second most common cause of cancer death in affluent countries. Dietary modifications might reduce this cancer burden by up to 70% (2). Three recent meta-analyses showed that total meat intake is not related to risk but that intake of red or processed meat is associated with a modest, but significant risk of CRC (3–5). Processed meat intake appears to be more closely linked with the risk of CRC than fresh red meat intake. In its 2007 report, the World Cancer Research Fund panel recommended that one should limit intake of red meat and avoid processed meat (1).

Several mechanisms may explain the relationship between the risk of CRC and the intake of red or processed meat. First, meat cooked at high temperature contains mutagenic heterocyclic amines. But heterocyclic amines might not be major players in CRC risk, as: (i) consumption of chicken is a major contributor to intake of heterocyclic amines, but is not associated with the risk (6); and (ii) doses of heterocyclic amines that induce cancer in animals are 1,000 to 100,000 times higher than the dose ingested by humans (7). A second hypothesis suggests that the high saturated fat content of red and processed meat increases the risk of CRC. But several studies, including a recent meta-analysis, showed no effect of saturated fat on colorectal carcinogenesis (8–11). A third hypothesis concerns the carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds (NOC), which can be formed in the gastrointestinal tract by N-nitrosation of peptide derived amines or amides. The role of NOC in human cancer is discussed in the following text. Other more unlikely hypotheses involve the high protein, cholesterol, and salt content of red or processed meat. For a review of all these mechanisms, see ref. 12.

Source:

http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/4/2/177

Grape extracts may protect against colon cancer

Colon cancer is a very common form of cancer, affecting tens of thousands of people across the United States. Researchers may have just moved closer to a prevention strategy for this condition, as a compound that suppresses colon cancer stem cells is found in grapes.

In the U.S., colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer among women and the second in men.

The American Cancer Society estimate that in 2017, more than 95,500 people will develop cancer of the colon, almost 40,000 people will have rectal cancer, and more than 50,000 deaths will be caused by colorectal cancer.

A team of researchers led by Jairam K. P. Vanamala, associate professor of food sciences at the College of Agricultural Sciences at Pennsylvania State University in State College, set out to examine the effects of grape compounds on colon cancer stem cells.

More specifically, the researchers tested the effect of a combination of resveratrol – a polyphenolic compound found in grapes, red wine, peanuts, and some berries – and grape seed extract.

As the authors write, the study rests on the theory that “most, if not all, cancerous tumors are driven by [cancer stem cells].”

“Cancer stem cells are capable of self-renewal, cellular differentiation, and maintain their stem cell-like characteristics even after invasion and metastasis,” explains lead researcher Prof. Vanamala.

The findings were published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Grape extracts halved cancer tumors

Prof. Vanamala and colleagues examined 52 mice with colon cancer tumors. They divided the rodents into three groups: one group was fed the grape compound combination, another group was fed sulindac (an anti-inflammatory drug previously found to reduce tumors in humans), and one group was given a normal diet.

The researchers found that the number of tumors in the mice that had the grape compound diet decreased by 50 percent. This drop was similar to the one seen in the sulindac group, but unlike the anti-inflammatory drug, the grape compounds did not cause any gastrointestinal toxicity.

In vitro, the experiments yielded similar results, determining the “molecular basis for the beneficial effect” of the grape compounds on human cancer stem cells.

The study also found that resveratrol and grape seed extract did not suppress cancer stem cells as effectively when taken separately and in small doses. It seems to be the combined effect of the two that produces the best results.

“The combination of resveratrol and grape seed extract is very effective at killing colon cancer cells,” says Prof. Vanamala. “And […] the combination of these compounds is not toxic to healthy cells.”

 

Colorful diet may prevent colon cancer

Prof. Vanamala suggests that the findings may bring us closer to understanding why cultures that traditionally eat more fruits and vegetables have lower colon cancer rates.

For instance, some studies have hypothesized that the West African diet may be the reason that Nigerians have a much lower rate of colon cancer compared with Caucasians.

Nigeria, along with other African countries, has been shown to have the lowest cancer rates in the world.

Plant-based diets may provide several key compounds that kill off cancer stem cells, says Prof. Vanamala. He also recommends consuming a large variety of colorful fruits and vegetables to prevent colon cancer and other chronic conditions such as type 2 diabetes.

This also connects well with a plant-based diet that is structured so that the person is getting a little bit of different types of plants, of different parts of the plant, and different colors of the plant.

Prof. Jairam K. P. Vanamala

He adds, “This seems to be beneficial for not only promoting bacterial diversity, but also preventing chronic diseases and eliminating the colon cancer stem cells.”

However, Prof. Vanamala also adds that more work is needed to fully understand the anti-cancer mechanism behind grape compounds and other extracts in fruit and vegetables.

The researchers hope that their findings will set the stage for human trials that could test the effects of the grape compounds on colon cancer.

If these trials are successful, the researchers hope that the combination of resveratrol and grape seed extract could be taken in the form of a pill; this may protect against colon cancer and prevent the disease from recurring in those who survived the condition.

Source:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318007.php

Parts of Mediterranean diet shown to prevent colorectal cancer

The benefits of the so-called Mediterranean diet have been hailed in the news over recent years. Now, new research looks closely at the elements of the diet that could help to prevent the risk of colorectal cancer.

Among many other benefits, the Mediterranean diet has been shown to lower the risk of colorectal cancer. But the specifics of this beneficial role have not been studied in depth.

New research – presented at the ESMO 19th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, held in Barcelona, Spain – singles out the few components of the Mediterranean diet key for preventing colorectal cancer. The first author of the study is Naomi Fliss Isakov, Ph.D., of the Tel-Aviv Medical Center in Israel.

More specifically, the research looks at the link between the components of the diet taken both separately and in combination, as well as the risk of developing advanced colorectal polyps.

Colorectal cancer tends to develop from advanced polyps, or adenoma. However, the chances of polyps becoming malignant depend on various factors, including size, structure, and location.

Zooming in on the Mediterranean diet

Dr. Isakov and team examined 808 people who were undergoing either screening or diagnostic colonoscopies.

The participants were aged between 40 and 70 years old and were not at a high risk of colorectal cancer. The researchers took anthropometric measurements – such as body mass index (BMI) and height – of the participants, and they asked them to fill in a food frequency questionnaire. They also took part in a medical and lifestyle interview.

The researchers defined adherence to the Mediterranean diet as an above-average consumption of fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, as well as fish and poultry.

A below-median intake of red meat, alcohol, and soft drinks was also considered to be a key component of the diet. A Mediterranean diet was also described as having “a high ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fatty acids.”

For the purposes of the study, the researchers defined advanced polyps as adenomas larger than 10 millimeters in size, with a “high-grade dysplasia or villous histology.”

As the American Cancer Society (ACS) explain, the term “dysplasia” refers to the abnormal aspect of the polyps. “High-grade dysplasia” is a term used to describe polyps that appear abnormal or cancer-like. The ACS also note that larger adenomas tend to have a villous growth pattern and are more likely to lead to cancer.

Dr. Isakov and colleagues also examined healthy controls who did not have any polyps, either in the past or at the time of the study.

More fish, fruit reduces risk

Having compared individuals with polyp-free colonoscopies and those whose colonoscopy showed advanced polyps, the authors found a clear association between components of the Mediterranean diet and the risk of colorectal cancer.

People with advanced polyps reported consuming fewer elements of the Mediterranean diet. More specifically, the average was 1.9 Mediterranean diet components in the advanced polyps group, compared with 4.5 components in the polyp-free group.

Surprisingly, even two or three elements of the diet correlated with a 50 percent reduction in the risk of advanced polyps, compared with consuming no key components at all.

Additionally, the risk further decreased as the number of Mediterranean elements increased. The more elements of the Mediterranean diet people consumed, the lower were the chances of advanced polyps showing up in their colonoscopies.

The researchers adjusted for other risk factors associated with colorectal cancer and found that increased fish and fruit consumption, together with a low intake of soft drinks, was most likely to reduce the risk of advanced polyps.

We found that each one of these three choices was associated with a little more than 30 percent reduced odds of a person having an advanced, pre-cancerous colorectal lesion, compared to people who did not eat any of the MD [Mediterranean diet] components.”

Naomi Fliss Isakov, Ph.D.

She concluded, “Among people who made all three healthy choices the benefit was compounded to almost 86 percent reduced odds.”

ESMO spokesperson Dr. Dirk Arnold, of the Instituto CUF de Oncologia in Lisbon, Portugal, also comments on the findings, saying, “This large population-based cohort-control study impressively confirms the hypothesis of an association of colorectal polyps with diets and other lifestyle factors.”

“This stands in line with other very recent findings on nutritive effects, such as the potential protective effects of nut consumption and vitamin D supplementation which have been shown earlier this year.”

“However,” adds Dr. Arnold, “it remains to be seen whether these results are associated with reduced mortality, and it is also unclear if, and when a dietary change would be beneficial.”

Next, the authors plan to investigate the effects of the Mediterranean diet in a group at high risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Source:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318226.php