Tag Archives: adult coloring books

Adult Coloring Book for Stress Relief: Gardens, Mandalas, Flowers, Butterflies, Animals and Owls

77 Mixed patterns to color. This adult coloring book has over 77 animal patterns and provides hours of stress relief through creative expression. It features small and big creatures from forests, oceans, birds, elephants, mandalas, owls. Designs range in complexity and detail from beginner to expert-level. Adidas Wilson public Facebook page.

https://www.amazon.com/Adult-Coloring-Book-Stress-Relief/dp/1544026307/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

Destressing through coloring books and mandalas

Slow acoustic music plays out of a small speaker as campus junior Maithy Nguyen sits at her desk getting lost in the soothing sound of her colored pencil moving back and forth across the page. Maithy comes home from a stressful day of classes and has a mountain of homework ahead of her. But for just one hour, she lets herself get lost in giving life to the complicated black outlines on the pages of her coloring book. Coloring acts as a way to de-stress from the busy life she and most UC Berkeley students lead.

“I… love taking ’me’ time because I feel like being a college student and juggling a million different things, we don’t have a lot of time to just sit and reflect,” Nguyen wrote in a text message. “Coloring helps clear my head, I don’t do too much thinking when I’m coloring.”

Daxle Collier, a health educator for University Health Services, explained that while there may be a direct link between coloring and anxiety reduction, stress management is very personal and art may not work for all people in reducing stress.

“There are few early studies suggesting that coloring mandalas in particular can be useful for reducing anxiety,” Collier said. “But it’s very personal, so I think while coloring might be really useful for one person, it might not be quite as useful for another person.”

Nguyen, for whom coloring definitely works as a method of stress management, started coloring in high school but stopped when college started and she got too busy. She didn’t pick it up again until her sophomore year of college, after a series of stress-related breakdowns caused her to realize a lack of balance in her life.

“I realized I was not allowing myself any ’me’ time and being too stressed out would stress me out even more,” Nguyen wrote in her text message. “It was such an unhealthy cycle.”

Since then, she colors about once or twice a week for approximately an hour while she listens to music or watches TV to let herself escape from all stress.

UC Berkeley freshman Molly Tomlin, who also colors to relieve stress, prefers to do so in silence, although she will occasionally color while listening to music or when watching TV.

“I (color) alone and that’s a big part of it,” Tomlin said. “I’ve (listened to music) in the past, but I think the best way to go about it is just kind of doing it in silence.”

Tomlin has similar coloring patterns to Nguyen in that she has also been coloring since high school and continues to do so about once a week when she is feeling particularly stressed out.

“I’m constantly thinking,” Tomlin said. “So when I’m coloring, all I’m thinking about is what colors I’m using and staying inside the lines and how it’s going to end up looking, so my sole concentration is on that. It helps me clear my head.”

Tomlin may enjoy the constraints provided by the lines, but for others, the borders could be even more stress-inducing. Collier explained that while each individual has a specific type of art – ranging from coloring books to free-form – that benefits their mental health, art does not help at all for some people.

“While I think for some people coloring something in is less stress-inducing because they don’t have the pressure of, ‘What am I going to draw?’ or, ‘Is my drawing good enough?’ … for other people the opposite could be true,” she said. “They might feel constrained by coloring something in and would rather just do free-form art. Of course, for other people, neither would really be appealing, so I think it just depends.”

Both Tomlin and Nguyen agree that they prefer to color over doing free-form and particularly enjoy more complicated mandala patterns.

51ONGclHPJL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

Available on Amazon

 

Source:

http://www.dailycal.org/2017/03/19/destressing-coloring-books-mandalas/

Adult coloring books: a synonym for stress relief

As young children, many of us can likely recall spending a good amount of time flipping through the pages of our favorite coloring books, spending countless hours (if added up all together, that is) working on our latest pieces of art.

After reaching a certain age, though, many people put those books away and don’t really think twice about the coloring fun they once had. Here’s the thing, though: Adult coloring books are now filling the aisles, and they’re selling rapidly! Why? As it turns out, coloring can help reduce stress! How does it do this, though? And what are some of the health benefits of this calming activity? These questions, and more, are answered as follows…

Adult Coloring Book for Stress Relief: Gardens, Mandalas, Flowers, Butterflies, Animals and Owls

51ONGclHPJL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

Available on Amazon

To begin, how do adult coloring books help to relieve stress? According to an article written by Elena Santos on http://www.huffingtonpost.com, “The practice generates wellness, quietness and also stimulates brain areas related to motor skills, the senses and creativity.”

It enables participants, if you will, to focus on the task at hand without thinking too much about other, more stressful subjects.

In the aforementioned article, Santos also adds a quote said by psychologist Gloria Ayala: “The action involves both logic, by which we color forms, and creativity, when mixing and matching colors…The relaxation that it provides lowers the activity of the amygdala, a basic part of our brain involved in controlling emotion that is affected by stress.”

It certainly does.

In addition to keeping our minds stimulated and occupied, adult coloring books also have a sort of nostalgic effect, as they remind us of our childhood and of simpler times. Santos, a bit later in her article, adds another quote from Gloria Ayala regarding this aspect: coloring “brings out our imagination and takes us back to our childhood, a period in which we most certainly had a lot less stress.”

It enables us to remember and reflect upon those younger years when we spent a lot of time doing just as we pleased, but also helps our minds to concentrate and focus on what is important to us right now.

Now, what are some of the health benefits associated with adult coloring books? For one thing, they enable users to take a mental relaxation period during hectic (or not-so-hectic) days at work, school, or just in general, really. In fact, Jason Abrams, “an account manager at North 6th Agency, a New York City-based public relations firm,” told http://www.foxnews.com back in 2015 that “We’ll meet in the conference room on Friday afternoons and get our coloring session in…to help relieve the stress.”

Even some businesses are taking part!

As well as being a great tool for increasing levels of calmness and relaxation, though, these books are also helpful in pushing out negative thoughts: “Unplugging from technology”(www.colorit.com) and reducing anxiety levels. In the website mentioned previously (www.colorit.com), the author referenced Dr. Scott Bea, a clinical psychologist, who says that coloring “relaxes the brain. When thoughts are focused on a simple activity, your brain tends to relax” and nervousness levels, amongst other factors, as well, seem to decrease.

All in all, it’s clear that these adult coloring books really do seem to help us “de-stress” and to relax in our ever-so-chaotic lives. They enable us to focus on our happiness and health a little bit more, to remember our childhood, and to put away stressful thoughts and situations–at least for a little while.

And, though there is a difference between Art Therapy and coloring, in the words of Dr. Marygrace Berbarian, whose name is mentioned multiple times in an article (on Adult Coloring Books) on http://www.cnn.com, “Coloring definitely has therapeutic potential to reduce anxiety, (to) create focus…”

With all of this in mind, why not give it a try?

Source:

http://bphawkeye.org/features/2017/02/23/adult-coloring-books-a-synonym-for-stress-relief/

Print Sales Increase by 3.3% in 2016

The publishing industry has faced a tumultuous year with the election cycle, the decreased demand for adult coloring books and the lack of a breakout bestseller. People still bought books in droves and the sales of hardcover/paperback sales rose by 3.3% in 2016.

Most print formats had an outstanding year, with hardcover up 5.4%, trade paperback up 4%, and board books up 7.4%. Mass market has been on the wane since the introduction of e-books, and its slide continued in 2016 with a 7.7% drop in unit sales. Physical audio, where sales were down 13.5% on the year, but digital audio doubled.

overall-us-market-unit-sales

 

Source:

http://goodereader.com/blog/bookselling/print-sales-increase-by-3-3-in-2016

My Adult Coloring Book Finally Made it to Amazon

I was stressed out theoretically not literally of figuring the formatting for a mostly image based book. Well I uploaded directly to CreateSpace and within 24 hours it finally made it’s way to Amazon. I still have it on Lulu for now. 

77 Mixed patterns to color. This adult coloring book has over 77 animal patterns and provides hours of stress relief through creative expression. It features small and big creatures from forests, oceans, birds, elephants, mandalas, owls. Designs range in complexity and detail from beginner to expert-level. Adidas Wilson public Facebook page.

Adult Coloring Book for Stress Relief: Gardens, Mandalas, Flowers, Butterflies, Animals and Owls

51r7ae2ysll-_sx331_bo1204203200_

 

A Neuroscientist Patiently Explains the Allure of the Adult Coloring Book

A few months ago, I caved: I bought myself a coloring book. And maybe you did, too, or perhaps you received one as a gift for the holidays. According to a recent Fortune article, adult coloring books are one of the biggest contributors to this year’s boost in print-book sales. With over 11,000 search results total, five of Amazon’s current top 15 best-selling books are coloring books.

A few nights a week, I look forward to curling up on the couch with my ever-growing collection of colored pencils, tuning in to the latest episode of Serial, and scribbling away at mandalas and Harry Potters — but I still find the trend strange. I’ve always had a penchant for making new things from scratch — painting, knitting, writing, drawing, baking. But with my coloring book, I’m not really creating anything. The designs are already on the page — I’m just filling in the white spots. And yet the activity is just as soothing to my mind as my more traditionally “creative” hobbies. So what is the psychological draw of a task that feels creative, but doesn’t actually involve creating anything new?

In part, it’s a way for people who have never felt very artsy to literally add some more color into their lives. In a 2012 survey sponsored by Adobe, only one in four respondents reported feeling that they were “living up to their creative potential,” while 52 percent of Americans surveyed described themselves as creative — more than any other nationality. As psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman, co-author of the new book Wired to Create, phrased it, “It can provide people with a way to flex their creativity.” My artsy cousin Leanne has thoughtful insight on this. Compared to coloring, “finishing a drawing or well thought-out painting is much more satisfying in the end,” she says. “But I know how calming and rewarding it is, so I am a fan of adult coloring books because this popular fad is adding art into people’s lives.”

Indeed, many of my friends and family members sharing their new coloring loot on social media over the past few weeks told me that they are not the types of people who would typically consider themselves artistic, nor did they feel they had adequate time in their daily lives for lengthy creative pursuits. Coloring books, they agreed, are a convenient way to escape into their imaginations for just a few minutes or hours a day, time-permitting.

Whether you would consider yourself artistic or not, research points to the importance of incorporating a little bit of creativity in our daily lives. In one study, Yale researcher Zorana Ivcevic examined traits associated with “everyday creativity” – how we express ourselves in everyday situations, including our personal style and devising ways to cope with daily challenges. Those who ranked highly in having an overall “creative lifestyle” tended to be more conscientious, as well as more likely to seek out personal growth. Yet more new research has focused on how creativity, especially in the form of visual art, can improve physical health. In a study of 30 women with disabling chronic illness, those who had taken up art described the hobby as “cathartic,” distracting their thoughts away from their pain and promoting feelings of “flow and spontaneity.” Research also suggests that engaging patients with art can shorten the length of hospital stays by reducing stress and anxiety.

Of course, coloring within the lines compared to, say, painting a blank canvas is mostly simple decision-making — choosing which color goes best where, with relatively little skill involved. Our prefrontal cortex is responsible for coordinating thousands of decisions each day, from which socks we should wear to life-altering relationship and career choices. As an unconscious response to this so-called daily “decision fatigue,” making a series of small, inconsequential decisions (teal or mahogany for this squiggly line?) may give us a refreshing sense of self-control after a long day of big, important ones.

Source:

http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/01/neuroscientist-explains-adult-coloring-books.html

4 Reasons You Should Try Coloring

While coloring never goes out of style for kids, it’s now a booming business for adults as well. Sales in adult coloring books soared from 1 million in 2014 to a whopping 12 million in 2015, and colored pencil sales jumped 26 percent that same year. With Crayola releasing premium coloring kits designed for adults, it’s looking like adult coloring is here to stay. And for good reason: Coloring is not only fun – it may help you stay healthy. “Coloring appears to be universal – a valuable tool for individuals of all ages,” says Andrea Smith, PhD, a psychologist at Medical City Green Oaks Hospital in Dallas, Texas. According to Smith, coloring has the power to ease your mind and boost your mood. Here are four ways that coloring can brighten your life and improve your health.

Reason 1: Tame stress

On most days, your brain and body are in high gear. Whether you’re running from meeting to meeting or from soccer games to dance lessons, sitting down at some point in the day for even a brief coloring session can clear your mind of added stressors. “Often I’ll recommend coloring to patients as a part of their bedtime routine,” says Smith. Bonus: Making coloring part of your nighttime ritual means you’re shutting down electronics, and that can make for better sleep.

Reason 2: Reduce anxiety

Anxious? Get out the crayons. A study of 57 college students shows promising evidence that art therapies such as coloring, painting, drawing and clay modeling, even if done for short periods of time, may reduce anxiousness. And coloring might not only help with situational anxiety, but also with anxiety disorders. “Engaging in creative therapeutic tasks like coloring can induce relaxation that helps many people feel more in control of their anxiety,” says Smith. And while coloring might not be the “solution,” she says, it may be one piece of the puzzle, that, along with individual therapy, relaxation skills and medication, can help manage anxiety symptoms.

Reason 3: Improve focus

If you have a hard time concentrating, taking a break to color may help you return to your task with fresh focus. “Coloring gives us the opportunity to home in on a simple activity that does not require much planning or strategy,” Smith says. Further, she says, coloring only requires the brain to work on one thing at a time, thus helping the mind to focus.

Reason 4: Increase productivity

In a world of never-ending to-do lists, Smith says, we crave completion but rarely achieve it. And while coloring itself can’t check off your to-dos, it may give you a sense of accomplishment that primes you to get more things done more effectively. “Coloring provides a task that is fairly easy to accomplish,” she says. “You can take pride, even if it is just a little bit, in the fact that you completed something you started, regardless of the quality level. This builds confidence and increases productivity.”

This article originally appeared on Sharecare.com.

Source:

http://medicalcitygreenoaks.com/about/newsroom/4-reasons-you-should-try-coloring

The Mental Health Benefits for Adults Using Coloring Books

The popularity of adult coloring books has grown rapidly over the past year and the idea that it’s just for kids is fading just as quickly.

Mental health professionals have long utilized art in treating patients because it has a profoundly positive effect on mental well-being.   This form of therapy encourages self- exploration and helps in organizing emotions. Although art therapy received from a professional is more effective than coloring on your own;  coloring does have several benefits. It has been found that coloring can help adults:

1: De-stress

2:  Achieve a state of meditation

3: Reduce anxiety

4: Alleviate less severe symptoms of depression

5: Improve concentration

6: Boost creativity

While coloring can be beneficial; it is important for individuals to note that it is not art therapy and should not be used as a method of self-treatment for mental health disorders.  Art therapy differs from  coloring because it relies on a patient-therapist relationship. This dynamic is important in helping patients to express their problems to the therapist through art when they are not able to in words.

Creative arts therapy has been an integral part of the Department of Psychiatry at Jamaica Hospital for nearly 20 years. For more information about the program or to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-5575.

Source:

https://jamaicahospital.org/newsletter/?p=3073

“Coloring therapy” helps ease patients’ stress

Sandy Gantt receives infusions of chemotherapy to treat her leukemia for hours on end, day after day. But she’s found one thing that transports her from that reality to a less stressful place.

“Coloring is a nice, soothing distraction from treatment,” she said, shading an intricate mandala design. “I get lost in it, and it gets me away from my worries.”

Sandy’s participating in the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center’s new staff-driven initiative to help patients manage stress during cancer treatment. In addition to movies and cards offered to help pass time, patients can now pick up coloring supplies and pages from adult coloring books. The books feature a rich assortment of pre-drawn patterns, from abstract and geometric drawings to unique nature scenes and holiday-themed designs, and provide hours of mindful, calm and creative expression.

Sold by the millions, the coloring books are the latest anti-stress trend and, according to experts, help people in many settings, providing relief for veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, helping inmates manage aggressive behavior, as well as alleviating signs of stress and depression in college students.

Coloring reduces stress by activating the brain’s right hemisphere, explains Kathleen Lorain, an art therapist who facilitates creative projects at the UC Davis Medical Center to help pediatric patients, their siblings and parents cope with stress.

“When we are stressed or worried, we activate the left side of our brain, which is responsible for analytical and cognitive processes,” she added. “But when we color, we switch gears and access the right side of the brain, the creative, artistic region,” which quiets the left part, allows creativity to take over and blocks out worries.

Like meditation, coloring promotes relaxation by focusing the brain on the present moment.

“When patients color, they engage in the ‘here and now’ and practice mindfulness, which can be a very meditative and relaxing process,” Lorain said. “Because they’re occupied with thoughts such as ‘what color do I use?’ and ‘how should I color this part?,’ their right brain can relax and give them a break from difficult thoughts about procedures, their diagnosis, pain and the like. Art is a nonverbal way of processing all of these difficult feelings.”

And like many activities that require creativity, coloring can boost self-esteem and generate positive feelings.

“Facilitating the art-making process provides an opportunity for patients to create something, increasing self-esteem and returning control back to the patient,” Lorain added, which is critical in the clinical setting where patients can feel powerless and unproductive.

Each month, the Adult Infusion Center also organizes a coloring contest for patients and families. Winning pages are selected by patients and staff and displayed in the unit.

Source:

http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/publish/news/cvc/10807

Coloring Books for Adults Are Good for Creativity, and Selling in the Millions

Adele’s chart-topping tunes weren’t the only form of therapy adults welcomed into their homes last holiday season. With millions of copies sold on Amazon alone, it seems folks gladly took a break from their ball-point pens and to-do lists for a set of colored pencils and an “age-appropriate” coloring book.

For instance, Jason Abrams, a New York-based PR account manager, took to coloring books and crayons at 22 to offset the anxiety and stress of college life. With his career in full swing eight years later, he doesn’t plan on stopping anytime soon.

“Being in a creative field, it allows me to enhance my creativity and think outside the box,” he says.

Abrams says he prefers what’s considered “kid” coloring books, with themes ranging from Marvel’s The Avengers, football, Star Wars and indie rock. Once completed, he’ll keep them, share a picture online or even give it to someone. In some instances, Abrams has used the activity as a fun motivational tool in professional settings.

“It’s something I’ve done for a long time, and what’s really funny is that over the years my friends and my family, they kind of laughed about it — the same reaction I had when I was introduced to it,” Abrams says. “But don’t mock it until you try it … I’m happy to see the trend is catching on because I do really believe in the power of coloring and I hope it’s not a fad that’ll go away, because it can do a lot in terms of improving quality of life.”

Research supports Abrams. According to an article published by the American Journal of Play, the use of adult coloring books (or play in general) can improve career and academic success, reduce stress and encourage an innovative work performance. The practice can also help train the mind to better focus, relax and reset.

Also approving of the trend and its benefits, The American Art Therapy Association said “since engaging in any form of art can have stress-reducing value, it is no wonder that these sophisticated templates for adult coloring have taken on such great popularity.”

These coloring books aren’t just some passing activity for people who want to tap into their creativity — they’re big business. Three of Amazon’s top 10 best-selling products of 2015 were coloring books.

The most popular to date is Scottish illustrator Johanna Basford’s book, Secret Garden: An Inky Treasure Hunt and Coloring Book, having sold roughly 2 million copies worldwide.

Illustrator Jenean Morrison’s work also made an appearance on Amazon’s Bestseller list. Inspired after discovering an old coloring book from the ’70s in 2012, Morrison has since independently created and sold eight titles on CreateSpace, including Flower Designs Coloring Book, which was on the bestseller list for eight weeks.

Selling the books for about $12 each, Morrison earns approximately $5.05 per sale. Overall, she made about $350,000 in royalties from the site in 2015 and has published international editions of her books in eight countries. Morrison is also working with a publishing company to start distributing her work to 50,000 newsstands across the country within the upcoming year.

“Self-publishing is a great way to go,” Morrison says. “A lot of publishers right now are looking for coloring books, so it’s a viable option.”

Though the artist didn’t originally refer to her work as specifically for adults until the trend gained traction within the past two years, Morrison recognizes how adult versions are different from more elementary editions because of their complex and intricate designs. They also serve a different purpose, providing a host of potential benefits such as improved mental health or logic, problem-solving and motor skills; something morrison’s customers can easily attest to.

“This book will inspire your imagination, stimulate your senses and creativity, and as you become engaged in the enjoyable activity of Coloring, it calms you and almost immediately starts reducing your stress level,” Jackie Cooper wrote, an Amazon user and reviewer of Morrison’s best-selling book.

Source:

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/254682

Coloring books not just for children; they reduce stress in adults, too

SPEARFISH | Among the latest fads, adult coloring books have found a place of prominence in bookstores nationwide and online sites such as Amazon. So, what’s the allure?

 

Ask Aris Karagiorgakis, an assistant professor of psychology at Black Hills State University, about the subject and he’ll get nearly as animated as the artwork that students have produced as the result of his research into whether coloring can truly reduce the stress of everyday living.

 

“Even our store on campus has a stand with adult coloring books,” Karagiorgakis said last week. “It’s a big deal. Amazon has its own section for adult coloring books. Some of the adult books are really adult, even allowing curse words, but there really is some science behind the claim that it does reduce stress. It calms people and it’s fun.”

 

Karagiorgakis set out nearly three years ago to determine whether the creativity involved in coloring and drawing can reduce psychological and physiological stress. To date, his study groups have involved about 200 BHSU students.

 

“It’s developed into a monster project that could keep me busy for the next 10 years,” he said. “It’s a type of research where the more questions you answer, the more you have to answer down the line, and the more you learn.”

 

Subjects involved in the experiments have not been told what researchers are seeking. Tested individually, the students complete a psychological survey, allowing them to report their levels of stress, Karagiorgakis explained. Researchers also drew blood to measure participants’ stress via blood-sugar levels, he said.

 

Participants in the study were then subjected to six minutes of exposure to “arousing images,” including spiders and snakes, blood and crime scenes, and corpses and body parts, Karagiorgakis noted.

 

“We wanted to stress them out, and through subsequent testing, we found we did,” the professor said with a laugh. “Statistically, the stress levels were very high.”

 

Half the sample group was then directed to perform a relatively easy 15-minute copying exercise, transposing newspaper articles from the 1920s. Meanwhile, the other half of the group was given colored pencils and directed to draw anything they wanted.

 
 
 

“We asked them to draw whatever they felt comfortable drawing, such as figures, patterns, abstract works, anything,” Karagiorgakis said. “We really wanted them to use some creativity because we suspected that it was not just coloring or drawing, but it was the creativity factor involved.”

 

Following further testing, the research found that the stress levels of the sample group assigned to copying duties had returned to the same levels as when they had walked into the room. But the test group assigned to color and draw had stress levels “significantly lower than when they arrived,” the professor said.

 

“The ones who copied an article were brought back to baseline levels, exactly as we would have expected,” Karagiorgakis said. “The arts people, the people who drew or colored, dropped so low in their stress levels that they were even below the levels when they walked in. It was statistically significant, not a fluke. They were way more relaxed. It was really incredible stuff.”

Source:

http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/coloring-books-not-just-for-children-they-reduce-stress-in/article_866b2a46-4074-54d4-84a0-746fb71f236e.html

Adult coloring books: a synonym for stress relief

As young children, many of us can likely recall spending a good amount of time flipping through the pages of our favorite coloring books, spending countless hours (if added up all together, that is) working on our latest pieces of art.

After reaching a certain age, though, many people put those books away and don’t really think twice about the coloring fun they once had. Here’s the thing, though: Adult coloring books are now filling the aisles, and they’re selling rapidly! Why? As it turns out, coloring can help reduce stress! How does it do this, though? And what are some of the health benefits of this calming activity? These questions, and more, are answered as follows…

To begin, how do adult coloring books help to relieve stress? According to an article written by Elena Santos on http://www.huffingtonpost.com, “The practice generates wellness, quietness and also stimulates brain areas related to motor skills, the senses and creativity.”

It enables participants, if you will, to focus on the task at hand without thinking too much about other, more stressful subjects.

In the aforementioned article, Santos also adds a quote said by psychologist Gloria Ayala: “The action involves both logic, by which we color forms, and creativity, when mixing and matching colors…The relaxation that it provides lowers the activity of the amygdala, a basic part of our brain involved in controlling emotion that is affected by stress.”

It certainly does.

In addition to keeping our minds stimulated and occupied, adult coloring books also have a sort of nostalgic effect, as they remind us of our childhood and of simpler times. Santos, a bit later in her article, adds another quote from Gloria Ayala regarding this aspect: coloring “brings out our imagination and takes us back to our childhood, a period in which we most certainly had a lot less stress.”

It enables us to remember and reflect upon those younger years when we spent a lot of time doing just as we pleased, but also helps our minds to concentrate and focus on what is important to us right now.

Now, what are some of the health benefits associated with adult coloring books? For one thing, they enable users to take a mental relaxation period during hectic (or not-so-hectic) days at work, school, or just in general, really. In fact, Jason Abrams, “an account manager at North 6th Agency, a New York City-based public relations firm,” told http://www.foxnews.com back in 2015 that “We’ll meet in the conference room on Friday afternoons and get our coloring session in…to help relieve the stress.”

Even some businesses are taking part!

As well as being a great tool for increasing levels of calmness and relaxation, though, these books are also helpful in pushing out negative thoughts: “Unplugging from technology”(www.colorit.com) and reducing anxiety levels. In the website mentioned previously (www.colorit.com), the author referenced Dr. Scott Bea, a clinical psychologist, who says that coloring “relaxes the brain. When thoughts are focused on a simple activity, your brain tends to relax” and nervousness levels, amongst other factors, as well, seem to decrease.

All in all, it’s clear that these adult coloring books really do seem to help us “de-stress” and to relax in our ever-so-chaotic lives. They enable us to focus on our happiness and health a little bit more, to remember our childhood, and to put away stressful thoughts and situations–at least for a little while.

And, though there is a difference between Art Therapy and coloring, in the words of Dr. Marygrace Berbarian, whose name is mentioned multiple times in an article (on Adult Coloring Books) on http://www.cnn.com, “Coloring definitely has therapeutic potential to reduce anxiety, (to) create focus…”

Source:

http://bphawkeye.org/features/2017/02/23/adult-coloring-books-a-synonym-for-stress-relief/