Tag Archives: 3D Printing

Five Ways to Make Money with 3D Printing

This is a great opportunity for selling your 3D printed designs and making real money from your work. If there is one sector that is taking over the internet market with designed products, it is 3D printing. If you are trying to figure out the challenges of getting a share of the market, here are just a few ways you may find handy.

Getting exposure is one of the means to get going. This starts with finding an avenue for exposure, which you can register with companies that are offering an opportunity for 3D Printer owners to get into the business. With such a possibility, you can get to connect with consumers, business owners and even engineers who might need your help in some cases. Getting in touch with local customers could be your way to success.

3D Hubs and MakeXYZ are some of the options you can register with to get started. Online presence matters a lot when it comes to advancing your 3D printing into a business. You can create a store on Shapeways, where you can showcase your 3D designs and models, and then you can print-on-demand for consumers who like your work. Besides having all you need to market your design and templates, Shapeways have gone an extra mile to include a tool that helps with better customization of design known as the CustomMaker.

Since you are only building your small business, Shopify is the way to get started. Here, you only create your 3D designs, have them printed on any of these sites, or at a local bureau, and you start getting customer orders to print. For printing services that are engaging in renovation contractors and a home building where you can get clients with homes that require unique productions, and do work for them.

A good example is what Aztec Scenic Design is doing in Florida, if you hone your skills, this could be a great way of making money. You can advance by working together with electroplaters around you. If you can get someone who is ready to work with you, then you can chip in and start coating your products in gold, silver, nickel, and several others, which might bring you even more money.

Similarly, you can work with a Computer Graphic expert or animator to create better products from the characters they have, which can help you attain a significant milestone. There are a lot you can achieve owning a 3D printing business. All you need is to enhance your productivity to attain the standards that would impress your customers, and get out there.

The market is growing, and with it comes a very significant opportunity for 3D printing designers to make an income from their work. If the situation necessitates collaborating with others, then go for it and broaden your opportunity for better earning.

Sony Xperia XZ1’s scanner comes with a 3D printing service

When Sony introduced the Xperia XZ1 at IFA, the Japanese tech giant said it was seeking partnerships with 3D printing services to go with its pre-loaded 3D scanning app. Now, Sony and Sculpteo have revealed that they’ve teamed up to give people the power to 3D print anything anytime they want to, using only the XZ1. You don’t need to fire up your computer during any part of the process at all.

 

When you fire up the 3D Creator application, you’ll find Sculpteo’s 3D printing services integrated into its interface. Want to immortalize a childhood toy that’s falling apart or to produce a three-dimensional print of your own face? Just scan it (or yourself) with 3D Creator and send the file straight from within the app to Sculpteo’s machines. You can even pay from within the application and then send the finished product anywhere in the world. The 3D-printing outfit will print your creation using multi-colored materials and in the size your specify.

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The tech titan highlighted XZ1’s 3D Creator app at IFA, and it’s easy to see why — the pre-loaded application has the ability to generate realistic 3D scans of objects and people in under a minute. Sony even demoed what it can do by using the app to scan my colleague’s, Cherlynn Low’s, head, and the result was surprisingly detailed and life-like. By making Sculpteo’s services a built-in feature, Sony has made the XZ1 more attractive to builders, makers, creatives and anyone else who wants an easy way to scan and print objects. The XZ1 will be available on September 19th, so you only have to wait a few more days, though you’ll have to be prepared to spend $700 to get one.

Source:

https://www.engadget.com/2017/09/13/sony-xperia-xz1s-scanner-sculpteo-3d-printing-built-in/

Markforged announces two 3D printers that produce items as strong as steel

Markforged, a 3D printer manufacturer based in Boston, has just announced two new models — the X3 and the X5. Both of these printers are designed to create carbon fiber-infused objects using a standard filament printing system and both can produce items that can replace or are stronger than steel objects.

Both printers have auto-leveling and scanning systems to ensure each printed object is exactly like every other. Further, the printers use Markforged’s special thermoplastic fiber filament, while the X5 can add a “strand of continuous fiberglass” to create objects “19X stronger and 10X stiffer than traditional plastics.” This means you can print both usable parts and usable tools using the same machine and, thanks to the fiberglass weave, you can ensure that the piece won’t snap on use. For example, one customer printed a custom valve wrench in 10 minutes using one of these printers.

Now for the bad news. The X3 costs a mere $36,990, while the X5 costs $49,900. These are aimed at what Markforged calls “local manufacturers.” Luckily you’re not stuck with the printer if you outgrow it. The X3 can easily be upgraded to work with X5’s filament and both are aimed at manufacturing shops that need to produce finished products on the fly.

 

“Customers can now, with ease, print same-day parts that optimize strength and affordability for their specific needs,” said CEO Greg Mark.

These printers are part of Markforged’s effort at creating a real “teleporter.” Thanks to the complex scanning and measurement systems built into these units, users can receive a 3D printer model and print it to exacting specifications. The system also has a failsafe mode that restarts at any time as the laser scanner can check to see exactly where the print stopped. The company is also hard at work on some impressive metal printing technologies that turn out parts that are usable in complex machines.

Source:

Markforged announces two 3D printers that produce items as strong as steel

3 Methods for Defending Against Cyber Attacks on 3D Printers

With cyber attacks on 3D printers likely to threaten health and safety, a team of researchers has developed three novel methods to combat them.

“They will be attractive targets because 3D-printed objects and parts are used in critical infrastructures around the world, and cyber attacks may cause failures in health care, transportation, robotics, aviation and space,” said Saman Aliari Zonouz, an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

He co-authored a peer-reviewed study entitled “See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Feel No Evil, Print No Evil? Malicious Fill Pattern Detection in Additive Manufacturing” that was published at the 26th USENIX Security Symposium in Vancouver, Canada. It’s the security community’s flagship event, highlighting the latest advances in protecting computer systems and networks. Among several unique techniques, the research team from Rutgers and the Georgia Institute of Technology is using cancer imaging techniques to detect intrusions and hacking of 3D printer controllers.

“Imagine outsourcing the manufacturing of an object to a 3D printing facility and you have no access to their printers and no way of verifying whether small defects, invisible to the naked eye, have been inserted into your object,” said Mehdi Javanmard, study co-author and assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rutgers. “The results could be devastating and you would have no way of tracing where the problem came from.”

3D printing, also called additive manufacturing, plays an increasingly important role in industrial manufacturing. But health- and safety-related products such as medical prostheses and aerospace parts are being printed with no standard way to verify them for accuracy, the study says.

Even houses and buildings are being manufactured by 3D printers, noted Javanmard.

Instead of spending up to $100,000 USD or more to buy a 3D printer, many companies and organizations send software-designed products to outside facilities for printing, Zonouz said. But the firmware in printers may be hacked.

For their study, the researchers bought several 3D printers and showed that it’s possible to hack into a computer’s firmware and print defective objects. The defects were undetectable on the outside but the objects had holes or fractures inside them.

Other researchers have shown in a YouTube video how hacking can lead to a defective propeller in a drone, causing it to crash, Zonouz noted.

Source:

http://www.engineering.com/DesignerEdge/DesignerEdgeArticles/ArticleID/15480/3-Methods-for-Defending-Against-Cyber-Attacks-on-3D-Printers.aspx

3D printing homes for Mars

A team competing in NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge worked with Techmer PM to develop materials that could one day be used to house human visitors to Mars.

Teams of citizen inventors are participating in the competition to innovate technology to support deep space exploration and also advance Earth-based construction capabilities. A partnership between freeform 3D printing startup Branch Technology and architecture firm Foster + Partners, collaborating with Techmer, won third place in the most recent level, which involved 3D printing a structural beam using plastics and simulated Martian soil.

The team also took first place in the previous level, creating a truncated cone and cylinder from the material they developed. Next, they will be tasked with printing a dome structure for mechanical testing.

The idea is to enable customizable habitat options using locally available materials and potentially recycled plastics.

“If you think of a place like Mars — but also it could be remote places on this planet — if you try to build a structure, you’d have to send all these tools and materials and so on,” said John Manuck, Techmer’s CEO. “But if you could 3D print the structure, of course the 3D printer, you’d have to send that there, and some of the raw material, but then it can produce a whole range of products.”

Source:

http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20170811/NEWS/170819974/3d-printing-homes-for-mars

 

Prototype ‘3D’ chip from MIT could eliminate memory bottlenecks

Future CPUs will have to deal with growing amounts of data, but all too often they are slowed down by bandwidth issues between the processor and RAM. A prototype chip built by researchers at Stanford and MIT can solve the problem by sandwiching the memory, processor and even sensors all into one unit. While current chips are made of silicon, the prototype processor is made of graphene carbon nanotubes, with resistive RAM (RRAM) layered over it.

 

The team claims this makes for “the most complex nanoelectronic system ever made with emerging nanotechnologies,” creating a 3D computer architecture. Using carbon makes the whole thing possible, since higher temperatures required to make a silicon CPU would damage the sensitive RRAM cells.

This technology could do more than just speed up the framerate on your next Xbox too, as the current prototype used a top layer of one million carbon nanotube sensors to detect gases, with the information processed and measured directly on the chip. So far, the development has been funded by organizations including DARPA and the NSF. The next step in the process is to work with Analog Devices on new versions of the technology — unfortunately like so many graphene-related breakthroughs we have no idea when this one will be commercially available.

Source:

https://www.engadget.com/2017/07/06/prototype-3d-chip-from-mit-could-eliminate-memory-bottlenecks/

What We Can Learn about Creativity from 3D Printing 2017

This entrepreneur is betting big that you’ll want to drive a 3D-printed sports car

Entrepreneur Kevin Czinger is excited about the future of cars. But instead of focusing on driverless vehicles like Google and Uber, he has something else in mind: 3D-printing.

Enter his revolutionary take on automobiles — the Blade, a car built out of 3D-printed aluminum joints that snap together like legos.

As the founder of Divergent 3D, Czinger is betting big on the idea that car parts can be designed, printed and then assembled in micro-factories all over the country.

 

Divergent 3D raised $23 million in a series A round in January, according to Cruchbase.

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Czinger appeared on the season three premiere of CNBC’s “Jay Leno’s Garage” to show off his ultra-sleek 1400-pound, 700 horsepower prototype. Leno can be seen taking the car for a spin around Los Angeles in this YouTube video for his show.

“[Czinger’s] real goal is to sell this technology to major manufacturers,” Leno says. “And the cool thing is, it’s made right here in America.”

The Blade made its debut in June of 2015 at the O’Reilly Solid Conference in San Francisco, where Czinger touted the car’s revolutionary manufacturing technology and lightweight body.

Forbes noted at the time of the car’s debut that it was “unclear how auto-safety regulators may regard the Blade” but gave options for how the company may want to explore the issue.

Czinger also boasts that the production process is environmentally friendly — another facet close to Divergent’s core mission.

Source:

http://www.cnbc.com/2017/06/28/kevin-czinger-is-making-a-3d-printed-car-called-the-blade.html

MIT built a robot that can 3D print a building


A new system developed at MIT is able to print a basic structure in one go, according to the team’s paper in the journal Science Robotics.

The system comprises a tracked vehicle mounted with a large robotic arm. At the end of this robotic arm is a smaller, precision-motion robotic arm, used to extrude concrete or spray insulation material. It’s free moving, can be customized to print on any suitable surface and is intended to be self-sufficient.

The team tested the system by printing the basic structure of the walls of a dome 15 metres (50 feet) in diameter and 3.65 metres (12 feet) in height out of insulation foam. The structure took 14 hours to print in total, creating a mould into which concrete is poured.

The aim is “in the future, to have something totally autonomous, that you could send to the moon or Mars or Antarctica, and it would just go out and make these buildings for years,” said lead author Stephen Keating.

Source:

https://www.cnet.com/news/mit-robot-can-3d-print-a-building/

Nigeria, others to lose 66% of jobs to automation —World Bank

The World Bank president, Jim Yong Kim, on Thursday in Washington, said developing countries, including Nigeria, faced the risk of losing two-thirds of all jobs that currently exist to automation.

He also counseled developing countries to look beyond aids to foreign direct investment which he said has stronger impact than aids just as he called for the mobilization of idle trillions of dollars “sitting on the sidelines…to help meet the exploding aspirations of people all over the world.”

Kim Yong said these in his opening remarks at the ongoing World Bank/International Monetary Fund Spring Meetings in Washington.

According to him, “We estimate that two-thirds of all jobs that currently exist in developing countries will be wiped out by automation.”

He added that this is not something that would happen in the future as it had already started happening.

He said “Let me just give you one example. Two, three years ago we were arguing about whether 3D printing would ever be capable of taking over garment assembly because garment manufacturing, has been sort of the classic light industry that goes from country to country based on wages.

“Two years ago, I was told, ‘no way, garment manufacturing still requires human hands.  This will always be the way it is.  It’s going to be this way for at least another decade’. But I just met a woman who told me an exciting story about how she is making couture cotton T-shirts and other clothing in Haiti with 3D printers.  And she said, ‘you know, it’s exciting in the sense that we know that Haitians now can run 3D printers,’ but the downside is that there are far fewer jobs.”

He continued, “So something we were arguing about two or three years ago of whether it was possible, is already happening right now in Haiti.  And so for every country in the world, we have to think very seriously about what investments we need to make right now in order to prepare ourselves for the economy of the future. And for developing countries it’s definitely one of the most important things is more investment in human capital.”

On what The World Bank Group is doing to mitigate the effects of this, he said, “We have to find new and innovative ways to reach the poor, and make the world more secure and stable. We have to start by asking whether the private sector can finance a project. If the conditions aren’t right, we will work with our partners to de-risk that project or, if needed, de-risk entire countries or sectors.”

He added, “There’s never been a better time to find those win-win solutions. There are trillions of dollars sitting on the sidelines, earning little interest, and investors are looking for better returns. That capital should be mobilised to help us meet the exploding aspirations of people all over the world. And with the crises we face, our task is much more urgent than we ever thought.”

While responding to a question on aid effectiveness, Yong Kim said, “One of the things that we found is that foreign direct investment often has a much higher impact, much stronger impact on improving institutions and government than aid by itself.

“This is why we’re trying to bring together the financing we provide to governments and also the financing that comes from the private sector to create better institutions, more investment, more jobs, more economic growth, in a much more synergistic way.

“I think that’s the one thing we need to do much more effectively than we have in the past, because even inside the World Bank Group, the public sector side of the organization and the private sector side of the organization, for the most part, worked almost independently.

“Now, what we’re going to do is try to help both institutions evolve so that we can talk about de-risking entire countries with policy reform, improving the business environment, and at the same time facilitate the movement of private capital in a way that will lead to, we hope, more economic growth throughout the developing world.”

The World Bank president said his group was taking the issue of corruption concerning its interventions in countries seriously.

He said, “We at the World Bank Group have all kinds of measures, and we audit every single project.  We follow the possibility of corruption very, very closely. So, on corruption and misuse of loans and grants that don’t give any outcomes, we have been following that for a long time, but I think the big question now for us in terms of aid effectiveness is we have got to stop fighting each other for the low hanging fruit projects.”

Yong Kim urged countries to take education seriously as it is the bulwark against the impending employment crisis.

“You’ve got to reduce childhood stunting. You’ve got to improve your educational system, improve health outcomes.  And part of the reason that we’re focusing so much on private sector investments for infrastructure is so that we can try to free up resources to invest more in human beings so that more developing countries can be ready for the great complexity that’s about to come.”

Source:

http://tribuneonlineng.com/nigeria-others-lose-66-jobs-automation-world-bank/

3D-Printing Tools from Martian Dust Will One Day Help Us Colonize Mars

One of the many challenges of colonizing Mars is that the planet is lacking many of the natural resources we rely on here on Earth. We’ll need to bring as much of what we need to survive as possible, but you can only pack so much into a spaceship. So scientists are developing ways to utilize at least one of the red planet’s most abundant resources: dust.

We’ve had a hard time coming up with reasons as to why everyone needs a 3D printer here on Earth, but on Mars the machines could be used to manufacture tools, spare parts, even entire structures, habitats, and vehicles, given there’s no hardware stores for astronauts to visit if we eventually send humans on the 34 million mile journey. But 3D printers don’t make things out of thin air.

Adidas will produce 3D-printed sneaker with the Futurecraft 4D

Adidas has unveiled what it presented as a giant leap forward in the way sneakers are made.

The company revealed a new sneaker, the Futurecraft 4D, created with a 3D-printing process developed by the Silicon Valley startup Carbon. It says the process allows it to rapidly produce new sneaker designs and scale them up to mass-production. To start, it expects to release 5,000 pairs this year, and more than 100,000 by the end of 2018. That’s not a huge amount for a company that sells hundreds of millions of sneakers every year, but it’s a significant start—and it positions the company as a pioneer in mass-produced 3D-printing manufacturing.

Adidas plans to continue scaling up production through 2021. It didn’t say how much the Futurecraft 4D will cost, except to explain that it will come at a premium to start. But it says it is working to lower costs and increase manufacturing capacity.

The real benefits of the technology, however, go beyond just one shoe. In typical sneaker manufacturing, where the sneaker’s midsole is made with foam, the process goes: design, prototype, tooling, and finally production. Tooling involves building the metal moulds used to make the soles, and it’s expensive and time-consuming.

But now, says Gerd Manz, Adidas’ VP of technology innovation, “once the design is finished, you press a button and you print your midsole. This is a matter of two hours. Traditionally it takes you more than a month to build a mould to build a product.”

What that means is Adidas can speedily produce new designs, test them on athletes, and then put them into production if it chooses, without any major investment in new tooling. For example, since Adidas partnered with Carbon about a year ago, it went through 50 iterations of the Futurecraft 4D before arriving at the final product.

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Manz says the company foresees being able to quickly create soles tailored to specific sports, or even specific markets, and ultimately the goal is to allow a customer to be able to walk into an Adidas store and have a customized sole printed for them while they wait. (The company is already experimenting with allowing shoppers to get a sweater 3D-knitted to their specifications at a pop-up in Berlin.)

The German brand and its big rivals, Nike and Under Armour, have all been experimenting with 3D printing, but so far it’s been mostly restricted to creating fast, inexpensive prototypes. Adidas looks like it will become the first to put a 3D-printed sneaker into mass production.

What makes all this possible is the 3D-printing process created by Adidas’ partner in the venture, Carbon, whose investors include BMW, GE, and Nikon. Where most 3D printers fuse together layers of plastic, Carbon’s method, inspired by the T-1000 robot from Terminator 2, uses light and oxygen to create an object as it’s extracted from a pool of gooey, photosensitive resin. Here’s how Quartz technology reporter Mike Murphy has previously explained it:

A light shines through the pool of resin, which causes the resin to harden. Oxygen, on the other hand, causes the resin to liquify. Using them both in combination, a light source can be intricately controlled like a three-dimensional film projector, so only certain parts of the resin are pinpointed and hardened as the object is pulled out of the goo.

 

Adidas and Carbon say the process lets them create more complex geometric structures than other 3D-printing methods, allowing for better performance, since the midsoles can be designed to cushion and respond differently to specific areas of the foot. It’s faster, too—between 25 and 100 times faster than traditional 3D printers, according to Carbon CEO and cofounder Joseph DeSimone.

The final product has a smooth surface and looks like one piece, rather than the rough, layered look produced by other printers. It’s an important detail when you’re selling consumer products that double as fashion.

Source:

What the six-year drought did to California in 93 maps and two charts

Brands see the future of fashion in customized 3D-knitted garments produced while you wait

One of the futuristic promises of 3D printing in fashion was that one day the technology would allow you to walk into a store, give the staff your measurements, and walk out with a garment made on the spot, just for you.

We’re not there yet, but the scenario is becoming a reality for 3D knitting, a cousin of 3D printing that uses yarn to produce a complete, three-dimensional item. Rather than the stiff plastic product created by a 3D printer—good for sneakers, less so for clothes—it produces sweaters, jackets, and anything else you could knit.

Some brands are already using it in their factories to produce garments. The fall collection of Uniqlo’s U line will include 3D knit items, and the brand is working on a new production system based on the technology. But a couple adventurous labels, including Adidas, are experimenting with 3D knitting on-demand in stores, hinting at a greater role it might play in fashion production and retail in the years ahead.

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Maybe the most significant effort thus far comes from the Boston-based label Ministry of Supply, which has permanently installed a 3D-knitting machine at its Newbury Street flagship in the city. Aman Advani, a cofounder of the quickly growing label, which makes performance clothes for the office, says it took a 60-foot crane to install the 3,000-pound machine. “This isn’t a niche product,” he explains. “This is step one of a longer route to a sustainable and strong production method that’s here to stay.”

The company is betting that in-store production will be the future of retail. In theory at least, the benefits are clear: 3D printing allows shoppers to personalize items to their specifications, meeting the growing demand for customized products. It lets stores carry less inventory, since a garment is only created when there’s a customer ready to purchase it, meaning less risk of stock that doesn’t sell and has to be discounted. And it turns retail into an experience, providing a reason for customers to visit a brand’s brick-and-mortar stores and build a personal connection with it, rather than simply shopping online.

Ministry of Supply is starting off with just one 3D-knit item, an office-ready jacket (though the knit and weight make it look more like a cardigan) with plans to expand the offering later. “The fit is spectacular,” Advani says. “It’s built to move around in, so it will tend to look a lot sharper than a traditional cut-and-sew garment.”

Source:

Brands see the future of fashion in customized 3D-knitted garments produced while you wait

DUBAI’S DHA TO USE 3D TECHNOLOGY TO PRINT TEETH

Dubai Health Authority’s dental services department will begin using 3D technology to print teeth later this year.

Using this technology, a dentist will scan the teeth using an intra-oral scanner, which will create a digital impression. This image is then sent across to the 3D printing machine through the intranet from DHA dental clinics, which then replicates the image as a 3D model. The 3D image helps accurate planning and precision especially for complicated dental procedures and surgery. Patients will greatly benefit from the use of this technology as it helps in better patient outcomes as well as substantially reducing waiting time and cost of care.

This use of the technology is the beginning of the authority’s ambitious plans to use 3D printing in all fields of healthcare. The government aims to make Dubai and the UAE a global hub for 3D printing technology by the year 2030. Research is already taking place into the mass production of hearing aids, prosthetics and implants.

DHA has become the first in the Middle East to use smart pharmacy for dispensing and prescribing medication. The robot in Rashid Hospital can store up to 35,000 medicines and dispenses 12 prescriptions in less than one minute. The robot dispenses the prescribed medication with a click of a bottom based on a barcode, minimising any human error and greatly reducing waiting time. DHA will soon be using similar robots in all DHA hospitals.

Source:

https://www.imtj.com/news/dubais-dha-use-3d-technology-print-teeth/

Print out a sweater with Kniterate, a 3D printer for knitting

3D printing is great if you need to create something made of plastic or even metal or ceramic out of thin air. But what if you want something fuzzier and warmer? Something, like say, a hand-knit scarf or sweater?

Enter Kniterate, a “digital knitting machine,” that makes it easy to take digital designs and automatically knit them into wearable fabrics at the push of a button. Simpler designs like scarves and ties can be knitted wholly by the Kniterate, while more complex pieces like dresses or sweaters will require a bit of assembly after the machine has done its work. The company is also developing an app to make it easy to design new patterns, add images and text, and customize the type of stitches used.

According to the Kickstarter page, Kniterate hopes to bridge the gap between traditional home knitting machines (apparently a thing that’s been around since the ‘80s — who knew?), which are cheaper but complicated and tricky to use, and more expensive industrial machines. That said, a single Kniterate costs $4,699 on Kickstarter, with only 125 units being offering through crowdfunding. And if you miss that, you’ll be stuck paying $7,499 at retail, which certainly stretches the price point for “consumer” a bit.

Obviously, given the price and the fact that Kniterate is an extremely complex piece of hardware and software from a first time company, it’s worth doing your own research before putting up the cash. The first Kniterate units are expected to ship in April 2018.

Source:

http://www.theverge.com/circuitbreaker/2017/4/3/15162846/kniterate-digital-knitting-machine-3d-print-design-stitches-kickstarter

2017 Vancouver Fashion Week: Australian Designer to Debut Dress with 150 3D Printed Butterflies

Artists, and most certainly fashion designers, are known for their willingness to take risks. With the advent of the 3D printer, not only could they suddenly branch out into a wealth of infinite new directions, but they were afforded previously unheard of self-sustainability in manufacturing, making everything from museum-quality couture to the avant-garde and even tribal feather accessories. 3D printing has made an indelible mark on the fashion industry, and it just keeps expanding as a powerful new tool in fashion.

Now, an Australian designer hailing from Canberra is going to make her mark at the 2017 Vancouver Fashion Week, ongoing from March 20 to 26. And while we’ve seen plenty of dresses and fashion accoutrements at this point, this will be the first gown featuring 3D printed butterflies. Designed by Charne Esterhuizen, the dress is adorned with 150 butterflies, to be exact—and each one took 5.5 hours to print.

 

“It is the first be made to this scale nationally, because you have big brands that have done 3D printing, but this is a completely different and experimental way of printing,” said Esterhuizen who had two different 3D printing companies as sponsors (Aussie 3D and 3DGence), paying for six 3D printers. “I used a modular system, so I multiplied the object of the butterfly, created into a fibre and connected them one by one until the dress was 175 centimeters long.

We had the machines printing for a week and a half non-stop. All together we calculated with all the time it took, all of the material and processes, the dress would cost about $90,000.”

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Not surprisingly, this butterfly-laden garment does have some weight to it, but the designer states that it is wearable. Also not surprisingly, she says that she hopes to see her dress morph into a 4D design with moving butterflies later, as she continues to work on the motif. The model wearing the dress (and also a nude-colored suit underneath) will also be showing off a matching purse created from the excess rubber material.

“The idea of this dress and my collection is to express yourself freely, to just be yourself and be confident despite what other people think,” she said.

With a love of fashion that began at age 16, Esterhuizen enrolled as a student at Australia’s TAFE. No stranger to being quite the superstar in her field from the beginning, she has already won an array of awards, and is now the creator of the MAAK clothing line. As a newly minted manager at Aussie 3D, she also has great resources for experimenting further with 3D printing, and is fond of using the technology in environmentally friendly ways.

“Fashion is one of the biggest waste industries in the world and with the future technology of 3D printing we can make filament with all natural fibres so it can be biodegradable,” she said. “Mass consumption and designers competing for cheaper garments is what increases slave labor. So we are working on how locally-manufactured and environmentally ways of 3D printing can combat this. I’m educating schools and the wider community about the benefits of 3D printing to the fashion industry.”

Source:

https://3dprint.com/167798/vancouver-fashion-week-2017/

This Home Was 3D Printed in Only 24 Hours and for Just $10,000

3D printing is incorporating itself into our clothes, our medicine, and, now, even our homes. Apis Cor., a company dedicated to building the world with printing has built its first ever 3D-printed home in Stupino town, a region near Moscow, Russia.

Construction took only 24 freezing hours during December, 2016, through temperatures of -35°C (-31°F). The home, equipped with a living room, kitchen, bathroom, and a hallway, was made on-site, a world’s first for 3D-printed building constructed in that amount of time.

The total cost of construction for the 38-square-meter (409-square-foot) home was $10,000, including the expenses of work, materials for the construction, and furnishing. That’s $266 per square meter ($81 per square foot), but the company is confident that a square house with a simpler design and averagely priced material would cost only $223 per square meter ($68 per square foot).

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The construction of the home was made possible by a mobile 3D printer. Once the mobile printer had completed the walls, it was removed with a crane manipulator to allow manual workers to come in and finish the job.

Source:

https://futurism.com/this-home-was-3d-printed-in-only-24-hours-and-for-just-10000/

How 3-D technology helped surgeons separate conjoined twins

On October 13, a surgical team stood over two 13-month old boys who were joined at the head and shared up to 2 inches of brain tissue.

Jadon and Anias McDonald were born as craniopagus twins, an incredibly rare condition affecting just one in millions, and October 13 was the day their family had been waiting for. It was the day this team of doctors and nurses at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in New York would separate them.
The operation was risky and complicated, but the surgeons were confident.
 
 
Before they had made a single cut, they felt like they knew what to expect. Like they’d seen it before. And in some ways, they had — virtually.
Across the country, a team of designers and engineers anxiously awaited the outcome of the surgery. Some of the members were in the operating room, as it was their work that gave the surgeons a look into Jadon and Anias’ shared brain before they were anywhere near the operating room.
At 3D Systems outside Denver, traditional two-dimensional imaging like CT scans were converted into complex three-dimensional models. Some of the models became virtual files the surgeons could manipulate. Others were created by 3-D printers, models the surgeons could hold in their hands.
“We worked hand in hand with the neuroradiologists,” said Katie Weimer, vice president of medical devices for 3D Systems. “We were online for hours with that team, looking at each slice of the imaging data, deciding, is this side Jadon? Is this side Anias? What’s happening with this particular set of vessels?”
3-D printing is not new in the medical field. For years, it has been used for a variety of items such as splints, implants or models for other operations, like heart surgery.
3D Systems has collaborated on dozens of conjoined twins’ cases over the past decade, but the McDonald boys presented a complex new challenge.
Craniopagus twins are extremely rare, occurring in only one of out of every 2.5 million births. About 40% of these twins are stillborn, and another third die within 24 hours of birth.
There are not many surgeons who have operated on craniopagus twins, but Dr. James Goodrich, at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore, is a world expert on them.
For his team, the surgery started with a virtual planning session courtesy of 3D Systems.
Source:

How 3D and Self-Design Will Change Technology

There is no doubt 3D printing is more than a temporary nourish for the world. According to some recent surveys, the worldwide 3D printing industry is now projected to reach revenues $12.8 billion by 2018 and surpass an enormous $21 billion globally by 2020.

 

The role of 3D cannot be undermined — from product design in the technology industry to modeling and presentation in the real estate sector, 3D has proven its stay. Self-design, an advancement on 3D designs that allows users to create custom designs from which manufacturers can create a customer-specific product is the new trend.

Here are some ways 3D and self-design are making the world a better place.

 

Touchable Picture

Isn’t it amazing if the blind and visually weaken could feel images? 3D technology has made it achievable for the world. With the advent of cutting-edge printers, the users can print the photographs and pictures in 3D version. What’s more? 3D models of even unborn babies can be created with this technology.

 

Customized body parts

 

Owing to amazing customization features of the 3D and self-design techniques, it will be possible to design and build implants depending on the needs and requirements of the clients. It means that the technology will help to get improved body parts.

Sturdier and better means of transportation

 

Nowadays, most transportation companies are using 3D printed parts to increase the strength and protection of the vehicles. This technology is utilized to design even planes. 3D printed components to make the plans lightweight and sturdy. When it comes to evaluating a vehicle, we always look at fuel efficiency. With 3D components, vehicles are made fuel efficient.

 

Comfortable plaster cast for broken bones

 

Traditional plaster casts are somehow uncomfortable to carry. But modern plaster cast built with 3D design are easy to wear and more hygienic.

Faster medical progress

 

The role of 3D technology is really great in the healthcare sector. It brings various new discoveries in medicine. It saves loads of time and resources spent on surveys and researches. Owing to the advanced printers and supplementary devices, it is now easier and faster to design and craft tailor-made implants.

Improve working efficiency

 

Various tasks related to design have become quick, simple and efficient with 3D and self-design technology. It improves the efficiency and reduces the need for manpower. Ultimately, it speeds up the production and reduces the expenses.

Faster solutions

 

At present scenario, designs and looks of almost everything are changed very rapidly. 3D printers allow the employees to save time and let them focus on their main work. It helps to streamline the work. Creating faster and a proficient solution are easy with a smart printer.

 

Brian Walker, Ph.D., the co-founder, and CEO of CircutScribe says self-design will make 3D adoption rate even faster. “Due to the speed at which jobs can be completed, from the customer interaction point to the printing and manufacturing stage, a lot of previously wasted time will be cut. This means more people will adopt 3D as a way of getting things done,” he said.

 

Improved and engaging education

 

The emergence of art and technology has changed the way schools offer education to the students. With the 3D and self-design technologies, students learn various subjects especially, science, technology, engineering and math with fun.
Art and technology have always been interconnected, but now they are allied more than ever before to change the world.

Source:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-morrow/how-3d-and-selfdesign-wil_1_b_14634962.html

How To Make Money With 3D Printing: The New Digital Revolution

As 3D printing is becoming increasingly popular, many people are striking a fortune and making it big in the industry. Such achievement may not be a cakewalk, but then seeking ways to get a breakthrough is by far the only way to get there and realize what others have conceptualized into moneymaking means. If you have always had interest in 3D printing and you are into making money with this technology, it is about time you worked smart to beat the challenges ahead.

3D printable models may be created with a computer-aided design (CAD) package, via a 3D scanner, or by a plain digital camera and photogrammetry software. 3D printed models created with CAD result in reduced errors and can be corrected before printing, allowing verification in the design of the object before it is printed.

Several projects and companies are making efforts to develop affordable 3D printers for home desktop use. Much of this work has been driven by and targeted at DIY/Maker/enthusiast/early adopter communities, with additional ties to the academic and hacker communities.

Three-dimensional printing makes it as cheap to create single items as it is to produce thousands and thus undermines economies of scale. It may have as profound an impact on the world as the coming of the factory did….Just as nobody could have predicted the impact of the steam engine in 1750—or the printing press in 1450, or the transistor in 1950—it is impossible to foresee the long-term impact of 3D printing. But the technology is coming, and it is likely to disrupt every field it touches.
— The Economist, in a February 10, 2011 leader

How To Make Money With 3D Printing: The New Digital Revolution

As 3D printing is becoming an in-thing, many people are striking fortune and making it big in the industry. Such achievement may not be a cakewalk, but then seeking ways to get a breakthrough is by far the only way to get there and realize what others have conceptualized into moneymaking means. If you have always had interest in 3D printing and you are into making money with this technology, it is about time you worked smart to beat the challenges ahead.

3D printable models may be created with a computer-aided design (CAD) package, via a 3D scanner, or by a plain digital camera and photogrammetry software. 3D printed models created with CAD result in reduced errors and can be corrected before printing, allowing verification in the design of the object before it is printed.

Several projects and companies are making efforts to develop affordable 3D printers for home desktop use. Much of this work has been driven by and targeted at DIY/Maker/enthusiast/early adopter communities, with additional ties to the academic and hacker communities.

Three-dimensional printing makes it as cheap to create single items as it is to produce thousands and thus undermines economies of scale. It may have as profound an impact on the world as the coming of the factory did….Just as nobody could have predicted the impact of the steam engine in 1750—or the printing press in 1450, or the transistor in 1950—it is impossible to foresee the long-term impact of 3D printing. But the technology is coming, and it is likely to disrupt every field it touches.
— The Economist, in a February 10, 2011 leader

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